A look at my drill application

Since I’ve mentioned this in multiple posts I thought I’d provide a little more detail. Here’s a screen shot with some food terms.

Ugh, WordPress is hard to get images right, hope this looks OK after saving. Good, for some reason the image looks bad in WordPress’ post editor but I chopped the screenshot to fit and it looks OK after posting.

BTW: Spanish readers out there will note kokotxa in this list which is really Basque, not Castilian which would be cococha.

Anyway, the basic idea is to load a random (though biased to get most effective drilling) set of words and then I visually examine them. Most drills do some sort of “quiz” but this is for me so I just scan the list.

If I don’t instantly know the translation I click the word. That gives me a score of -1 (otherwise if I don’t click a word it gets a score of 0, for appearing but “known”). I don’t “cheat”, since this is just for me, so I don’t need a quiz.

But if I have the least bit of doubt I click and then I see the translation. Then I decide: a) was this a mistake that I clicked and then click Ignore button, b) if I thought I knew the answer but was wrong, then I click the Wrong button and my score becomes -3, and, c) if I really didn’t know at all (or my “guess” was wildly wrong) I click the “no clue” button and get a score of -10).

After I’ve looked at all the words I click Done to record the results. Then I click Drill to get a new set of words (which is more likely to repeat wrongs with scores other than 0). I continue as long as I can stand and then click Save (unless I’m just testing code) and the scores are then added to the XML database.

And if I’m sure I want to record the results then I can use the File menu item to save a new copy of the the XML.  The XML Editor and XML Update are what I use to fix issues in the database itself.

All the drill results are saved in another part of the XML (eventually making it very large, hurrah for having lots of RAM to have all this in memory – I come from the days when RAM was scarce and had to do lots of programming tricks, now I just brute force all this).

Then I have an analysis routine (WIP) to consolidate all the scores over all the drill sessions to find out which words are worst (lots of mistakes, therefore drill more) and which are best (few or no mistakes, so only drill after some time has passed).

While I intend to create other types of drills this is “good enough” to have me looking at a fair portion of my vocabulary every day (todos los días) and thus keep refreshing my wetware memory. I can’t do this very long (so the magenta number on the screen shot is a timer of how long I’ve been doing drills, rarely do I exceed 20 minutes) because I’ll start having “short-term” memory (since my mistakes are more likely to repeat in the drill, by design) and so I begin to “know” them, but not really.

I’m focusing the drill (really the way I’ve created the XML database) on recognizing the Spanish, since, again, my goal is reading menus, not writing them. So my database is (now) poorly structured for doing English drills, which is harder than the Spanish drills, but more useful if I need to be able to ask questions about the menus.

And of course this is all “written” rather than spoken drills and to be really helpful I actually need to know how hablar a camarero but I’m getting there.

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