Santiago’s Restaurant Menus – 2

Unfortunately I don’t have time today for a full explanation of another menu so I’ll just get started. In case a reader might wish to explore some of this material for themselves let me explain how I’m finding restaurants.

For small towns along the Camino it was easy. The Google Maps, either map view or sat photo view, did a good job of showing any food establishment (including bakeries or grocery stores or wineries and such). Clicking on those brings up, usually, lots of photos to examine and sometimes a website.

But for a thorough examination of a city as large as Santiago (with 571 restaurants in one rating system) something more efficient is needed. I found the TripAdvisor website to be quite useful. I’m not endorsing their reviews or ratings per se, but it’s an easy source to study. So, simply, I make my own list in three columns: ranking, restaurant name (scraped off the TripAdvisor page for that restaurant) and then my evaluation of whether there is more information, or in my main priority, either a website with menus or sometimes just the menu link. Let me say, as little as any of these establishments would care, forget silly Facebook pages and get a real website. Maybe you think the world gets all its information from Facebook but I believe a better website would bring you more business. Nothing wrong with a Facebook presence, just don’t make it the only way people find about you. AND, even if it’s just a sample put some menu on your site. Glossary photos and flowery prose doesn’t sell on choosing your establishment but a menu might.

All that said let’s just start on today’s restaurant, one that has dual language on the website, descriptive prose about the restaurant’s culinary philosophy and a helpful menu. I’m talking about Malak Bistro. The homepage seems to be in English but there is a clickable toggle to Spanish.

There is some prose on the page that makes for interesting reading. As usual here’s the three columns: Spanish, their human translation and Google Translate.

Comida Exótica Vegetariana y Vegana Exotic Vegetarian Vegan Food Vegetarian and Vegan Exotic Food
Saludable Flexitariano Healthy Flexitarian Healthy Flexitarian

Now both the description and menu are interesting, but actually this wouldn’t be one of my top choices. That said, my purpose is not merely to study food terms for what I like but to get a complete sample for what might be encountered in Spain so I’m glad to see something different. And I’d be happy to go here with people I know who might make this their first choice.

Now let me just start with their first paragraph of prose.

Situado en la capital de Galicia, el Malak Bistro es un punto de encuentro para los peregrinos que llegan a Santiago de Compostela buscando degustar los sabores de la comida Exotica Vegetariana Vegana & Saludable Flexitariano .

Con ingredientes de primera calidad de origen gallego, los comensales pueden disfrutar de platos típicos de la gastronomía nacional.

Located in the Galician capital, Malak Bistro is a meeting point for the pilgrims that come to Santiago de Compostela and want to taste the Exotic Vegetarian Vegan & Healthy Flexitarian flavours.

The clients can enjoy typical dishes of the International gastronomy, cooked with Premium quality ingredients from Galician origins.

Located in the capital of Galicia, the Malak Bistro is a meeting point for pilgrims arriving in Santiago de Compostela looking to taste the flavors of Vegan and Healthy Flexitarian Vegetarian Exotic food.

With top quality ingredients of Galician origin, diners can enjoy typical dishes of the national cuisine.

Part of what I decided to do as part of my attempt to actually learn Spanish was to supplement what Duolingo provides with my attempts are translation. It was particularly helpful (and interesting) to have human translation as well as the Google Translation. Translation involves choices that goes beyond just “paraphrasing” the original language material (rather than purely literal) but also I found deviating quite a bit from the Spanish (as best I could read it). This poses an additional challenge to anyone trying to use a corpus approach to “train” a translation app, but it presents an interesting teaching experience.

Looking at the words in the first sentence that I marked I spot something unexpected. The Google Translation is more “accurate” (not just crudely literal as it often is). Since I’ve had the verbs llegar (to arrive) and buscar (to look for) in my Duolingo learning I do believe GT is actually more accurate. Now while translation can often have nuance and verbs often have many translations depending on context, these two verbs are fairly clear. In the second sentence there is no way ‘international’ is an accurate translation of nacional BUT I’ll agree, given the cuisine of this restaurant it can be descriptive.

As further indication consider this paragraph again marked.

A través de los aromas de la canela, la pimienta negra, el perejil, la cúrcuma, el curry o el tomillo,

nuestros clientes descubrirán los sabores de la gastronomía de oriente medio. Platos con mucha tradición que se construyen sobre ingredientes como: Verduras, garbanzos, arroz, carne o cuscús.

In our kitchen we use spices like: cumin, cinnamon, black pepper, parsley, turmeric, curry or thyme.

We prepare middle eastern recipes, most of them cooked with vegetables, chickpea, rice, meat or couscous.

Through the aromas of cinnamon, black pepper, parsley, turmeric, curry or thyme,

our customers will discover the flavors of Middle Eastern cuisine. Dishes with a lot of tradition that are built on ingredients such as: Vegetables, chickpeas, rice, meat or couscous.

See ‘cumin’ in the human translation (middle column). That’s nowhere to be found in the Spanish AND there is a Spanish equivalent of ‘cumin’ which is comino. Now given cumin is a word of Middle Eastern origin you might think comino is just a corruption of the original word but after all the word also appears in Latin as cuminum and as Spanish originated with vulgar Latin comino makes sense. (btw: ‘vulgar’ in this context simply refers to language in common use versus more proper “academic” use)

So, combined with the fact the default language of the website appears to be English I would suspect: a) the original material was written in English and translated to Spanish, or, b) perhaps, both English and Spanish are written separately (possibly by different people) and not strictly translations. Another hypothesis that might be more likely is that the “original” menu is not in either English or Spanish and both are translations.

So keep something like this in mind when you try to use your phone to read menus.

Now just one item from the menu to further amplify my deduction. And, btw, it was a challenge to create my side-by-side worksheet since the menu items aren’t in the same order on the Spanish and English versions of the menu. No diner would care about this but it makes for an interesting challenge to do what I’m doing and ALSO means automatic corpus extraction would fail.

ENSALADA FATOUSH
(Exotic Siria) Tomate, Lechuga mix, cebolla, pepino, rábano, limón, pan tostado, sumaque. (Vegano)
FATOUSH
Exotic Siria – Tomato, cucumber, mix lettuce, onion, radish, lemon, toast Pita, sumaque. (Vegan)
FATOUSH SALAD(Exotic Syria) Tomato, lettuce mix, onion, cucumber, radish, lemon, toast, sumaque. (Vegan)

Looking at the ingredients in both human and Google translation you’ll note the items are not in the same order, though it is the same list. Now this would be a problem for me, if I were composing a corpus of matching pairs (using human translation) but interesting using the Google translation would lead to matching pairs, e.g. (cebollo=onion), (pepino=cucumber) and so forth.

I’ll finish extracting and analyzing this menu to see if there is anything else worth noting in another post.

Santiago’s Restaurant Menus – 1

Yesterday I introduced this thread: finding, analyzing and discussing Spanish food terms on menus in Spain. So today I’ll continue with the restaurant I mentioned yesterday:  O Curro da Parra.

Now first I want to introduce the idea of finding human translations. In my earlier work I usually used Google Translate to translate the Spanish and then did additional research to try to improve translations. Now that I’ve learned a bit of Spanish I can do that better, but there are many reasons why the Google Translate is wrong and/or may not be that helpful which I’ll point out with a few examples in this post.

But in terms of learning to read Spanish getting human translations is interesting. To supplement my study on Duolingo I’ve found as many stories as I can with human translation to compare to Google Translate and my own stumbling attempts to translate.

So in terms of the main topic of menus, some like O Curro da Parra do have human translation, which, of course, might be wrong too. But my first point is also that sometimes they can be tricky to find. Some websites, like a couple others I tried in Santiago detect your location and, for me, automatically switch to English. Sometimes it takes a little hacking of the URLs to find both the English and Spanish or sometimes there is something in the UI (often flags to click) to pick your language. Of course there is no guarantee the English version will just be a translation of the Spanish version so you need to compare these carefully.

In general (and this specific case) the URL is likely to contain /es or /en in the URL. Sometimes you can just manually change the URL for which language you want. But for this restaurant they added an extra trick. Their standard URL for Spanish version of the a la carte menu is https://www.ocurrodaparra.com/es/carta, Replacing the /es with /en doesn’t work since they also translated carta in the URL to its English equivalent thus producing the URL https://www.ocurrodaparra.com/en/menu.

Seeing carta and menú on webpages (or perhaps the printed menu) deserves a little explanation. carta, which Google literally translates to ‘letter’,  as in escribo muchas cartas a mis amigos (I wrote that myself, see I’ve learned a little), but in the case of a restaurant it does, usually, refer to the a la carte menu or just menu as commonly used in USA. Seeing ‘letter’ originally confused me but I had to learn words may have multiple translations. While Google Translate does use some “context” (not just literal word-by-word) I’ve learned GT pays little attention to the broader notion of “context” (or discourse) and thus seems to usually pick the most common translation. And menú often refers to some special offer, like menú del día, (menu of the day, common in small restaurants along the Camino) or even more specifically menú de peregrino (the pilgrim’s menu) or sometimes menú degustación (the tasting menu). IOW, these are particular selections essentially equivalent to prix fixe, which is, of course, French for fixed price. So one of the first things to know about reading menus is which section to look for and so I hope this helps.

So onto a few interesting things about this menu. First we’ll start with the section on the Carta, EMPEZAMOS. Now actually this is a bit surprising since the more common section you’ll see is ENTRANTES, literally ‘entrances’ but probably what would be called appetizers in USA. But  is fun for me because just recently I’ve been doing Duolingo drills of variations of the verb empezar (to begin, to start). So empezamos is actually the first personal plural conjugation in indicative mood present tense, so big surprise that GT translated this as ‘we start’ which would be correct in the right context. But here it just means (and its human translation at the website) ‘starters’. But the way empezar is one of the Spanish verbs that is somewhat irregular known as a stem changing verb so empiezo is ‘I start’ (I don’t know when I named this blog that subject pronoun are usually omitted to the to (I) is not typically used since person can be deduced from the conjugation. So for you Dear Reader I can also use the familiar conjugation, just as empiezas for ‘you start’. I realize including Spanish lessons in my posts may be tedious, but relax, I’m just bragging.

Second, under the “main” course part of the carta (in this case labeled PESCADOS Y CARNES, fishes and meats) one finds Media ración/Ración. This was a tiny mystery until seeing, for each item, 11,5/22. That’s the price, in euros I presume and note the /. ración is repeated with media in front of one instance. It would be a mistake to assume that’s a cognate and thus “medium” (or worse, ‘media’ itself). In fact it’s the word for ‘half’, which in the case of a time, a las cinco y media, means “half past” (AKA 5:30).  ración  can get confusing; it’s literal meaning is ‘helping’, ‘portion’ or ‘serving’. It’s most commonly used where tapas or pinchos might also be available. Instead of just a serving for one bit usually it means a larger quantity, sometimes also described as al centro (to the center), IOW, it’s a portion that potentially gets shared. Given it appears in the main courses I would assume the full portion might be for sharing (two diners trying two different dishes (platos) which can be fun) and the half portion is for an individual diner (comensal).

So let’s move on to a couple of items. I’m going to show these in three columns: the original Spanish, the human translation at the website and the Google Translation.

Brevas, queso del Cebreiro y foie Figs, Cebreiro cheese and foie Brevas, Cebreiro cheese and foie gras

I’m not sure why GT missed the translation of brevas to figs, except perhaps that the more usual word for fig is higo and breva refers to a particular fig, often called ‘early fig’.  But my point for this item is Cebreiro which is not translated by either human or AI. And this is common (you are getting the ‘cheese’ clue in both translations, which is not in the literal Spanish) as some words just don’t have English translations. Cebreiro is a local cheese (PDO), Galician in origin. There are numerous sources for quesos de espana but take it from me, it’s fairly hard to learn them all.

Moving on

Sardina, pan de maíz tostado, mayonesa de laurel y Padrón Sardine, toasted corn bread, bay maho and Padrón peppers Sardine, toasted cornbread, laurel mayonnaise and Padrón

Interestingly GT does a bit better job with mayonesa (really is) so I’m not quite sure why the human translation calls it maho, other than perhaps having seen ‘mayo’ in English sources and assuming the phonetic spelling in English would be maho. In the Spanish, Padrón is sufficient because anyone would know what these are (we even have some growing in our garden in Nebraska, not even too hard to find the plant stock). These are very popular peppers, usually toasted in oil and sprinkled with coarse salt. They’re partly popular because while they’re usually mild, one might be hot, so while I forget the term (read it somewhere) sometimes they’re referred to as Spanish lottery. They’re smaller than a Jalapeno with more wrinkles but otherwise look similar.

Moving on

Canelón de gallo de corral, bechamel de foie e shimeji Rooster cannellone, foie bechamel and shimeji mushrooms Cannelloni with poultry, bechamel with foie e shimeji

This one is fun because it demonstrates it is global world with food terms from France, Italy and Japan all combined with Spanish. In this case the GT translation is better (sorry for my critique to whoever did the translation).  I’ve encountered de corral before and while a literal translation could be ‘of the farmyard’, we’d probably call this “free range” in USA. But using gallo (instead of pollo) is interesting.  pollo is the generic name for chicken, well known in USA due to heavy use on Mexican menus. In fact, pollo is even masculine (gender is such a thrill learning in a language) and so gallina would be a likely term for ‘hen’ and so gallo is indeed rooster, but a little stranger because roosters are much less commonly eaten than hens. I assume they note this because most likely gallo would probably have a stronger flavor. Canelón is cannelloni  but as Italian is fairly particular about the last vowel in words, cannellone might be confusing.

And wrapping up (there are more items but this is enough for this post)

Helado de tarta de Santiago, cremoso de chocolate y bizcocho cítrico Almond ice-cream, chocolate mousse and citrus sponge cake Ice cream cake of Santiago, creamy chocolate and citrus cake

tarta de Santiago is very common (usually dusted with powdered sugar) so they must have used similar ingredients to make an ice cream and I’d bet GT’s translation of ‘ice cream cake’ is not likely to be correct. But here’s a good example of why I (eventually) decided to learn Spanish, this is an item were the menu description is probably less than you’d like to know so a little conversation with your camarero might be in order. GT is probably wrong on cremoso  just being ‘creamy’ (which it literally is) but the human translation as mousse is more likely. Then GT omitted ‘sponge’ in the translation of bizcocho cítrico (bizcocho is usually translated as sponge cake) and reading this, as a diner, I’d think citrus sponge cake and just citrus cake were two different things.

So wrapping this one up: 1) don’t trust any translation source completely, 2) they are often terms that can’t be translated so you just have to know what they are (or ask), and, 3) if you’re really interested in knowing what these items are you’re probably going to have to be able to speak and hear some Spanish, even though I’d bet a top-rated restaurant in a popular tourist destination probably has someone to explain it to you in English, figuring it out in Spanish is more fun.

And as your homework assignment you figure this one one:

Cerdo pibil, crema de maíz y pico de gallo Pibil style Galician pork belly, corn purée and pico de gallo salad Pig pibil, corn cream and pico de gallo

and what does gallo have to do with a relish? And why ‘belly’ is missing in the Spanish and whether that would matter to you in choosing whether to order this or not.

 

 

 

Reading menus in Spain

scroll down to the bottom of this post to see Spanish terms for food allergens.

I started this blog to document work I was doing to collect a large corpus of Spanish terms found on menus (focused on Spain, not Latin America) and from that develop an application to aid in reading menus. You might think this already exists with one of the AI translation systems but those make many mistakes with food.

Anyway that was over a year ago and I’ve gotten side-tracked on various things. It was suggested I should just learn Spanish but I always felt that was too difficult (I’d tried unsuccessfully before) and also menu terms are more specific than more generic Spanish classes. My notion, as a software type, is my application is simply a question of manipulating symbols. Sure reading literature or poetry does required knowing the language and very well at that, but cooking and cuisine and food are a specialized vocabulary with minimal need for understanding grammar or conjugation or what is usually taught in language classes.

Well, in the end I gave in. It turns out reading a menu is one thing, actually being able to ask questions (preguntas) about it and understand the answer is another. My early research demonstrated that what is written on menus, often, is inadequate to actually know what dish you’re getting, what’s in it and how it’s prepared.

So 186 consecutive days later I have been learning Spanish from a very good online site, Duolingo. According to them I’m up to 1526 lexemes (about 1/3rd through their course). But while that’s been very helpful: a) that course doesn’t have much about food or cooking (I have phrases for how to order though and two words for waiter, camarero and mesero and why sometimes it should be an ‘a’ instead of ‘o’ at the end), and, b) even just for reading (like restaurants often have prose descriptions of themselves and their culinary approach on the menu) is not entirely aided by the types of drills common to language learning programs.

IOW, it has helped and is helping, but it’s not enough. So, in fact, my original notion is still fairly valid, focus on menus and how to read them.

Now in order to find menus I do this silly thing of converting miles I put in on a treadmill in the basement to a GPS track of the Camino de Santiago. Then using Google Maps I’ve explored all sorts of restaurants along the Camino. Now most are simple mom-and-pops with fairly limited menu but every now and then you get to a large city where the cuisine can be considerably more sophisticated. And as I mentioned in a recent post I’ve “reached” Santiago de Compostela which attracts lots of tourists and partly as a consequence has 571 restaurants at just one rating site. IOW, lots of rough material to study.

In addition, with help of some Spanish (Spain) cookbooks, lots of exploring menus, that in additional to cuisine in Spain having many regional variations there are also regional languages to deal with. When you start the Camino you see a lot of terms from the Basque language and when you end in Galicia you see Galego which I learned is more related to Portuguese than Castilian. Since I’m casually exploring Portuguese at Duolingo one quickly learns why A and O appear so often in Galicia, being the equivalent of the la and el the’s of Spainish.

So I’m now digging through menus in Santiago and expect to have a number of posts from that work. But just to put a little meat in this post I’ll describe one interesting thing I just saw. The restaurant O Curro da Parra is my first menu I’ll describe but I wanted to discuss this bit. For example we see an item:

Helado de tarta de Santiago, cremoso de chocolate y bizcocho cítrico6

(A: leche, huevo, gluten, frutos secos)

At first I thought the bit in parenthesis was ingredient but then realized (not explained on website) the A: probably stands for alérgeno (allergen) or alergia (allergy). Isn’t that nice of them to provide information, about the dish, for people with food allergies or sensitivities. So I’ve collected this list from the entire menu:

apio celery
crustáceos crustaceans
frutos de cáscara fruit peels 
gluten gluten
huevo egg
leche milk
moluscos mollusks
mostaza mustard
pescado fish
sésamo sesame
soja soy 
sulfitos sulfites
frutos secos nuts

Now most of these are straightforward but there are a couple of mysteries. First is soia which the restaurants website translates as ‘soy’. But that doesn’t match anything I find in references since soy is usually soja (in Spain) and soya (in Latin American) so I assume that’s some regional spelling difference (and Google Translate thinks it’s ‘soy’).  And frutos de cáscara continues to be a mystery. It’s mentioned for a dessert and translated at the website as ‘nuts’, but the websites also lists another item frutos secos  which is the more common translation of ‘nuts’.  cáscara by itself is ‘rind’ or ‘shell’ so my guess is this is actually a reference to ‘peel’ of a fruit (and probably lime since that is included in the name of the dessert). So even with dictionaries and AI translations and even human translations you might still not be able to figure these out exactly and if you do have allergies you probably need to know for certain, so hablo con el cameraro.

More coming, stay tuned.

 

Beef by any name is ???

One of the fun things about trying to study menus in Spain is figuring out the correct terms for ‘beef’. Here is the USA, and especially in Nebraska, the second largest beef producing state in the USA (surprise, Texas is first, obviously, but what about Montana or Colorado?), it’s just beef (and if beef, as in a steak, is not explicitly stated it can be safely assumed).

Now the cuts of beef (or any meat) is yet another subject, most menus include ‘beef’, but what do they call it. It’s almost always “grilled” (various names for that) either on a hot iron cooking surface or over coals on a grate. IOW, it’s some kind of steak and as best I can tell, from looking at photos and reading descriptions, it’s more or less the generic “steak” (almost certainly beef in the USA). It’s hard to tell from the menu whether you’d get an old tough piece of cow (most likely) or something a little better. Of course in beef crazy parts of the USA there are lots of terms as well.

But is beef just beef and it doesn’t much matter, i.e. red meat cooked fairly rare. Now Spain certainly has an ample supply of lamb (lots of names for that) or pork (uncured, fairly simple, i.e. cerdo and cured, well, lots of names for that).  If you’re not avoiding red meat you’re fairly safe getting almost anything that is “grilled” (mistakenly often called barbecued in the USA, which is rarely the case, since real BBQ is something entirely different, both the meat itself and the method of cooking).

The most common term (from my non statistically significant analysis) is ternera , which most dictionaries would call ‘veal’. But this is not really veal as we’d think of it, especially relevant to Italian style veal preparations. In Spain this seems to just be, mostly, a young cow, not the anemic milk-fed very young calf you might think of as veal.

Now as an outsider (and not as a butcher or rancher) I believe ternera is just a young cow, not much different from feedlot beef in the USA. Any USA producer of beef faces the issue that at some point you’re spending more money to keep a cow alive than that cow is gaining in commercial meat, so most feedlot beef is actually fast growing young cows. It is more gourmet (and much more expensive) to have more mature, larger cows, especially “free range” (I’ve sometimes seen terms that imply this in Spain) or even more expensive “grass fed”. So my guess is that ternera is most restaurants is not much different than generic “beef” one would find in the USA.

Now terms for beef in Spanish are also complicated because some of the countries in Western Hemisphere, esp. Argentina, are big beef producing (and consuming) countries and so you may encounter terms for beef, in dictionaries or web searches, that would rarely apply in Spain. But here are a few I’ve managed to collect:

carne vacuna: beef
Ternera de leche: veal
Añojo or ternera: 1-2 years old
Novillo: 2-4 years old
Buey: castrated male over 4 years old
Vaca: female over 4 years old
Toro: uncastrated male over 4 years old

Now vaca is somewhat common (in my sample of menus in Spain) and is, by dictionary lookup, just ‘cow’, i.e. again beef.  buey is less common, but as per the definitions above that’s because it’s from an older animal and thus probably even more expensive, even though it’s also probably tougher (to a degree tender and tasty are conflicting terms when it comes to beef).

The other term one finds, not in the list above, is de res which seems difficult to define and also is less commonly used in Spain.

But one amusing difference in Spain than the USA is that rather old cows seem to be an especial treat (when done properly). Apparently Spain imports older cattle and fattens them up. When you see photos of the raw cut of meat the fat is thick and very yellow compared to the usual whiter fat. I suppose I could be sold on this as an interesting meal, but it doesn’t sound likely. So while chuleton is common (for the older cows) you also encounter what may be very specialized term of txuleton (the Basque equivalent and likely even less common except in northern Spain).

Now as to eating toro I’ll leave that to others. I suppose Spain has to do something with all those bulls killed in the ring but I can’t imagine this would be a top-notch culinary experience.

So back to ternera – why is that so common? I’ve seen two explanations: 1) younger cows are butchered to reduce the chance of having mad cow disease, plausible but the term itself is older than the concern over mad cow disease, and, 2) that raising cattle to older age isn’t very compatible with the agriculture in Spain, either as “free range” and/or “grass fed” which is an expensive (and land intensive) way to get good beef, so really the economics and process of raising cattle in Spain, somewhat like feedlots in USA, encourages early “harvest” of the animal to human food.

While a simple grilled steak may be a “safe” choice at a Spanish restaurant I wouldn’t expect that to be a very desirable selection. The roast lamb almost certainly seems more delectable.

Probably by any name (and cooking technique) the various terms for beef will put on your plate something you can eat as a good protein source (assuming you even can stand red meat, avoid any of these terms if you don’t like meat) and maybe sometimes it will be a tasty choice. Coming from a part of the USA (originally Texas, now #2 in beef Nebraska, famous for its steakhouses) I imagine I’d always find this edible (and some “beef” I had in Germany was dubious as edible) so probably it’s hard to tell from just the menu alone the quality of the beef you’ll be eating.

 

 

 

 

Last 100km + some menu translations

It’s been a while since I’ve made any posts related to the primary purpose of this blog, which is analyzing menus in Spain in order to construct a translation application.  So now I’ll do a quick return to that kind of post.

In order to explore restaurants in Spain (and as an incentive to keep churning out miles on my treadmill in the basement) I’m converting exercise miles into locations along the Camino de Santiago and today I’ve reached the very last place you can start a trek and still qualify (need at least 100km) for a Compostela which looks to me to imply starting the Portomarín, at least along the route of Camino Frances and that’s where I just arrived after my 436.1 miles of virtual trek. Actually I think this remaining distance is probably some of the better real trek even if it is only a few days.

And there, in this relatively small town I also found a good restaurant, in Portomarín to consider for understanding menus and then relating a couple of points to you, Dear Reader. So I have to honor copyright and not put other people’s pictures in my posts I strongly suggest you go to maps.google.com and use this search “O Mirador, Portomarín, Spain”. Not to be plugging this restaurant but there are over a thousand photos accessible through the Google Maps site and lots of pictures of zamburiñas which Google Translate doesn’t understand, despite these being very common and popular in Galicia as well as an icon of the entire Camino pilgrimage.

Now the main way I study menus is to extract them into some working documents I created and then get the Google Translation. Generally GT does fairly well but it also misses or botches some terms. That then sends me into my research, using various dictionaries and food sites and just plain old searches to get clues to figure out a better (as needed) translation of the menu items. So for instance, zamburiñas which Google Translate doesn’t know Google search can easily find and even reference a Wikipedia article for ‘variegated scallop’. First in my search results is an article in Spanish, Diferencias entre vieiras y zamburiñas, which is quite helpful.

When I started this project over a year ago I actually knew no Spanish. I ignored advice to actually learn Spanish since I was convinced I could succeed without doing that. But as I admitted in earlier posts I realized the advice was right and so I’ve actually been plowing through learning the language, so in fact, I could mostly translation this key sentence (from the article above): Las zamburiñas son de unas dimensiones más reducidas comparado con las vieiras. Which of course doesn’t mean much unless you know (in addition to the other words) that vieira is the conventional term of ‘scallop’, that is the typical standard size (and the source of the shells on all the peregrino’s packs or on the trail signs).  So in case you can’t read the sentence (even though it’s got a lot of cognates to English) it just means that zamburiñas are much smaller vieiras. What that doesn’t tell is that these are quite popular (and widely available) in Galician and the ones shown in the photos connected with O Mirador make it clear (and persuasively looking delicious as well).

Now let’s consider the restaurant’s name. One of the menu items, Parrillada O Mirador, which Google translates as ‘Grill O Lookout’ is the typical highly literal translation GT does, without paying any contextual attention to the discourse, i.e. O Mirador is the name of the restaurant and parrillada is a diminutive term you more frequently see, which is parrilla, which is one of several terms that gets loosely translated as ‘grilled’ (usually with a la preceding it). In contrast with a la plancha which is also usually translated as ‘grilled’, plancha is usually an iron flat (i.e. the flattop grill in many restaurants) and parrilla is an actually grate over a wood or charcoal fire and thus what most of us home cooks would consider “grilled”.

Fine, but what about mirador being translated as ‘lookout’. This is why I want you to do the Google search and see the photos. spanishdict.com translates mirador as either ‘enclosed balcony’ or ‘lookout’ which it turns out, from photos, both equally apply. This restaurant is at the top of a hill overlooking the river and adjacent valley, but it also has a wraparound enclosed balcony for dinners. Looks like a fun place.

I had planned on covering some more interesting bits from the menu but I’m out of time (other duties call) and so I close with the promise that I’ll get back to writing about menus (yeah, sure).

A few words from Astorga

As I mentioned in my previous post I lost a long and heavily researched post about something unusual I found in the area around Astorga, or more properly La Maragatería (link is to Spanish language site) is a Spanish region located in the central area of the province of León. It seems there is a local meal (multiple courses) that many restaurants promote, the cocina maragato (link is to Spanish language site). While I won’t try to reconstruct my entire post about this I will recover a few things.

cocina maragato is a meal of multiple courses: meat, vegetables/legumes and soup but it has the unusual feature of being eaten in reverse of the normal order. This idea is summed up in this explanation from one of the restaurants serving this meal (original Spanish from website on the left, Google Translation on right, items of interest in bold).

El cocido maragato tiene la peculiaridad de comerse al revés.  

Primero las carnes, luego los garbanzos y verduras y por último, la sopa.

Estos tres servicios se denominan, en la zona, “vuelcos”. 

The cooked maragato has the peculiarity of eating upside down.

First the meats, then the chickpeas and vegetables and finally, the soup.

These three services are called “rollovers” in the area.

First, al revés can be translated as ‘upside down’ but it has multiple translations according to its Wiktionary entry:  as an adjective, ‘inverted (with respect to something)’ and as an adverb, ‘1) in the opposite direction or order, 2) back first, 3) inside out, 4) the other way around, and, 5) upside down’. revés alone has various definitions:  back, wrong side, other side, inside. Now given the numerous explanations of cocina maragato it’s clear the most useful translation, in this context is the ‘in the opposite direction or order’ since that is the key feature of this meal.

Second, my first encounter with cocina maragato was seeing vuelcos on multiple menus, such as: Primer vuelcoSegundo vuelco and Tercer vuelco. These are headings in the menu where one would normally see platos (in typical menu context, ‘courses’). So the translation as ‘rollover’ was definitely mysterious until one understands the cocina maragato context.

Still none of the online dictionaries have caught up to this meaning of vuelcos as they go with the simpler and more literal translations: ‘upset’, ‘spill’ or ‘complete change’. Interestingly Google’s choice of ‘rollover’ doesn’t appear but it is found in a reverse lookup of the English ‘rollover’ in spanishdict.com. So it’s hard to think of a single word translation that would imply the correct meaning in this context, but ‘inversion’ (or clumsy, ‘reversed course’) would probably be closer than ‘rollover’.

And since I can’t recreate the entire post I’ll just cover one other word that I’ve often seen on menus in the context that this restaurant uses:

El Cocido Coscolo no es sino un agradecido heredero del cocido tradicional maragato.

Sobre esa base, hemos introducido algunos cambios que hacen de nuestra propuesta algo diferente.

Su principal valor es la elaboración propia de los ingredientes.

The Cocido Coscolo is nothing but a grateful heir to the traditional cocido maragato.

On that basis, we have introduced some changes that make our proposal somewhat different.

Its main value is the preparation of the ingredients.

This restaurant, Restaurante Coscolo, is explaining how its eponymously named Cocido Coscolo is its version of cocido maragato. The word I’m focusing on is propuesta which I’ve seen on numerous menus and Google has always translated it as ‘proposal’.  In other encounters with this word ‘proposal’ made some sense in the context it is used but never seemed quite right, to me, as the translation. Dictionaries go further with these literal translations: ‘offer’ or ‘design’, or ‘nomination’ (in the sense of proposal of a candidate).  While the ‘nomination’, according to the dictionary would clearly apply to a person for a job/office, not a particular preparation, it nonetheless fits. Along with the idea of ‘offer’ or ‘design’. I’d use the translation, ‘take’, as in the phrase “our take on the traditional xxx is yyy”.

But this would be clumsy to have to explain this rather than just use ‘take’ as translation (which certainly wouldn’t fit other contexts). And this will be a challenge for the app I intend to build and suggests that one feature of the app has to be the ability to put a single word in the translation but touching that word would bring up a popup dialogue with a longer explanation to provide the context that is too verbose to include directly in the translation. So analyzing this menu and word provides insight to a UI feature I should include.

I had more about this whole area and other restaurants and this meal but this is all I can reconstruct in a reasonable time. You’ll just have to do your own research if you want more.

 

 

 

Multilingual menus in Spain

I took a detour from studyingg restaurant menus in León to San Sebastian. San Sebastian is 189 air travel miles east of León, along the Atlantic coast and near the border of France. This puts it squarely in Basque Country and its restaurant menus reflect that.

San Sebastian is also a very popular tourist resort with extensive beaches, recreational activities, luxury accommodations and dining, 728 restaurants listed with Trip Advisor. Since it is a popular tourist destination I discovered multiple restaurants there have multilingual menus. Interestingly sometimes they are just bilingual in Castellano (aka Castilian, the most common version of Spanish) and Euskara (the name of the Basque language in Basque) – not surprising due to the cultural influences.

The restaurant I’ll be discussing was interesting in that instead of alternate menus in different languages (which sometimes don’t match very well) it has all its menu items in four language, including French and English. While I’ll show some “translations” within the menu are not literally accurate at least in this kind of menu I get what a person believes is the item in different languages instead of machine translation. So this is from BODEGA DONOSTIARRA located in Donostia which is the Basque name for San Sebastian. A typical example is:

Ensalada de morros con guindilla y cebolleta

Google Translate:

Morros salad with chilli pepper and chive

from the menu

Muturren entsalada, pipermina eta tipulinarekin

Salade de museau de porc avec le piment d oquer et l ́oignon

Pork snouts salad with spring onions and local green peppers

Now sometimes having the French helps clarify the item but my project is to create a corpus of corresponding terms in English and [Castilian] Spanish so the remainder of this post will focus on interesting issues in this menu. For the item above, however, I’ll note several issues:

  1. Google has usually missed morro (in context) but does literally translate the single word (not in context) to ‘nose’. My dictionary prefers ‘snout’ (in sense of an animal part) and lists ‘nose’ only in the sense of an airplane part and lists ‘lip’ and ‘mouth’ as colloquial terms for body parts. I wonder what is in the Google corpus used to train their AI that decides morro is just morro in English which generally means ‘A round hill or point of land’ from various dictionaries so certainly its “context” is not culinary.
  2. The translation of guindilla to ‘chilli pepper’ is interesting. First the ‘chilli’ version of the word is the British not the USA spelling (chili). Second usually chile (and chili is a dish, well known to me as I was born in Texas, no beans, of course) is used in combination with pepper, so chilli is kinda doubly wrong for me. And while guindilla can be used as the generic ‘chile pepper’ it is actually a quite specific variety of pepper popular in the Basque areas also known as piparras.
  3. And thirdly cebolleta (the diminutive of cebolla (onion)) has various translations (according to spanishdict.com) as ‘scallion’ or ‘green onion’ (in USA) and ‘spring onion’ (in UK). Another bit of evidence that Google Translation AI is trained on a UK derived corpus. And, while unlikely in this menu item, cebolleta can also be ‘chive’ which any gardener knows is not the same as a scallion (which presumably is the same as spring onion).

So this is a good menu to look for some issues in translation by comparing the human and machine translations (as well as my “guessing” using various searches and lookups). So here’s how I’m analyzing the items on this menu.

Spanish (from menu) Human translation (from menu) Google translation
Ensalada Donostiarra (pulpo, boquerón, antxoas, sardinillas, bonito, guindilla) Donostiarra salad: octopus, anchovies, baby sardines, tuna and local green peppers Donostiarra salad (octopus, anchovy, antxoas, sardines, bonito, chili pepper)

There are a couple of interesting issues here:

  1. Google didn’t translate antxoas because, of course, this is the Basque spelling whereas anchoa is the more common Spanish. But there is something else going on in that boquerón also translates to anchovy, which Google got. A search for the difference between anchoa and boquerón gets a lot of opinions, none I can label as definitive but generally (and especially in this area) boquerón is probably also cured with vinegar.

    antxoas may not be the same as the generic anchoa since I did find this, “The Cantabrian anchovy or Bay of Biscay anchovy (scientific name, Engraulis encrarischolus) is one of the specialties of Basque cuisine” which could be very relevant in the context of this menu. But the human translation omits any translation of antxoas (or instead, possibly omits boquerón). So you pays your money, you take your chances.

  2. sardinillas is not in my dictionary but the Spanish for ‘sardine’ is sardina. So here it looks like the human translation is helpful in that they’re interpreting the diminutive form of sardina as ‘little’ which is appropriate. Given sardines are already little (given those packed in tins) I wonder what this really means. No clue from either translation whether these might be fresh or cured sardines which is a major distinction in Italian cuisine.
  3. Google almost always doesn’t translate bonita but sometimes does  generate the literal ‘pretty’. Trusting Wikipedia as a reference source we see that bonita is a valid English translation as it refers to a specific tuna, “The skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) is a medium-sized perciform fish in the tuna family, Scombridae. It is otherwise known as the aku, arctic bonito, mushmouth, oceanic bonito, striped tuna, or victor fish.”. The human translator choose to just call this ‘tuna’.
  4. And continuing the discussion of guindilla (from previous example) the human translation is interesting, ‘local green peppers’. Given the low heat level of the specific guindilla pepper I can see just calling it a ‘green pepper’ (not exactly what the USA reference is to a bell (or sweet) pepper) and labeling it as ‘local’ seems to distinguish it from the generic chile pepper translation. To me the padrón peppers look the most like “green peppers” but those are typically found in Galicia and so wouldn’t be “local”.

This single example does show a real challenge in “translating” menus – what really is this dish? Even the human translation would leave you guessing. And thus this shows a real limit to what any translation can do.

So let’s look at a couple more items.

Pulpo vinagreta “Salanort” Picled Octopus Octopus vinaigrette “Salanort”

Our human translator has a bit of a spelling problem with what almost certainly is supposed to be ‘pickled’ which is not really quite the same as one usually finds for vinagreta (usually a vinaigrette). But neither the human translator or Google explain what Salanort is. I’m relatively confident in what I found which is “a family business located in the fishing village of Getaria, 30 minutes from San Sebastian”. This qualifier appears several times for this restaurant and is typical of one of those terms that is a specific reference (aka brand) and has no translation BUT still may have some consequence to the customer.

Pintxo paleta ibérica Cured iberian ham pintxo Pintxo paleta ibérica

Google doesn’t translate paleta but it’s easily found in dictionaries as ‘shoulder [blade]’.  The human translation calls this ‘ham’ despite ‘ham’ having the clear Spanish jamón and usually ham comes from the rear leg of the pig, not the shoulder (however, in USA the so-called ‘picnic ham’ can come from the shoulder). And ‘cured’ is basically redundant with already saying ‘ham’. pintxo is interesting in that Google doesn’t translate this at all and pintxo is the Basque for what is called pincho in other parts of Spain (and in English as well and it is NOT tapas, the humorous scene in the movie The Way revealed). ibérica, which is literally Iberian, is not helpful, purely as a translation, but one could hardly go to Spain and not know what this means (and it’s not really a reference to Iberian Peninsula as dictionary says but instead to a particular type of pig).

And while there are numerous other smaller translation issues in this menu I’ll close with this one:

Pluma ibérica de Guijuelo  “Guijuelo” iberian pen Iberian feather  from Guijuelo

Guijuelo is most likely a reference to a municipality located in the province of Salamanca, Castile and León known for their pork. Here I believe the human had to use a dictionary for translation as pluma can be ‘pen’ but more likely ‘feather’ as Google decided. However neither of this is either correct or useful translation. It turns out this is more descriptive “The pluma is a cut from the end of the loin, and is juicier than the presa steak or the solomillo tenderloin. Pluma is fairly thin, but leaner than the ‘secreto’ skirt steak.” from online supplier La Tienda who will sell you one.

 

I’m continuing with other menus from San Sebastian that are multilingual including an interesting one for sushi where I might get some Spanish terms, if they exist, as translations from Japanese. The adventures continue.

a consultar about cecina

Even though I’ve now marched past León on my virtual trek I’m slowly plodding through the restaurant menus I found there. One menu, for the restaurant attached to Royal Collegiate of Saint Isidoro Hotel, has an English version as well as the Spanish. This is relatively rare and provides a unique opportunity to compare online machine translation of Spanish to the same material written in English. Of course, and as I found, the English text on a webpage may be different than the Spanish; after all it is aimed at a different audience and probably is not just a translation from the Spanish. Nonetheless a careful analysis may provide some interesting clues.

So I’ll start with a menu phrase, a consultar, which appears in three places (Spanish in first column, Google Translate in second, English from the website in third):

Pescado del Día (a consultar) Fish of the Day (to consult) Fish of the Day
Postre del día (a consultar) Dessert of the day (to consult) Dessert of the day
Domingo: Arroz / Fideuá (A consultar) Sunday: Rice / Fideuá (On request) Sunday: Rice / Fideuá (To consult)

Now consultar is a typical Spanish verb which has various meanings (the sense of the literal translation (in black) is marked in green:

  1. to consult (to seek advice from) (to refer for information to)
  2. to discuss with (to talk about)
  3. to look up (to look for)

or (Google translations of Spanish definition in green)

  1. Pedir información, opinión o consejo sobre una determinada materia (Ask for information, opinion or advice on a certain subject)
  2. Buscar información en una fuente de documentación (Search information in a documentation source)

Note that Google translated this differently as either ‘to consult’ or ‘on request’. Now to my sense the ‘on request’ makes less sense, either compared to dictionary definitions or that  por encargo is more common on menus for ‘on request’. Unfortunately the author of the English part on the website doesn’t provide an English equivalent in two cases and ‘to consult’ (the most literal translation) in the third.

So we’re really left without a good English equivalent. I would submit ‘ask your server’ as the common phrase you’d see in USA for these items. IOW, the X del día is a common phrase (less so in Spain) and ‘of the day’ in the USA. In most cases it means what the chef was interested in making today or what ingredients might have been available. So the customer can’t know, from the menu, what the item is and thus has to ask (btw, I don’t think this is the same as the “specials” often rattled off by servers so that wouldn’t be my preferred translation.).

So if I’m right (and I am getting the context right, if not the translation) this presents another interesting flaw in my project. There is NO way to read the menu and determine what this item is – you will have to speak to the server or the chef to find out and, of course, that requires some amount of fluency in both speaking and hearing Spanish (perhaps another type of aided communication app on a smartphone might work but unlikely the server would know how to use it; I tried this in China and totally confused a cab driver). My sister dismissed the idea of my project in lieu of just learning to speak and hear Spanish conversationally and maybe focus a bit more of restaurant and food vocabulary. I think this is a fine idea, but: a) it takes a lot of work I’d prefer software to do, and, b) I’ve actually tried and for some reason, despite modest fluency in a couple of other languages than English I just cannot hear Spanish (the sounds and the speed really confuse me, I watch movies with subtitles and rarely “hear” words I even know and know, from the subtitles, were in the audible portion). And like the jokes some more Spanish fluent people made about my sister my pronunciation would be awful and at minimum irritate a native Spanish speaker or very likely totally confuse them. So I have to try to continue on my path of using software (not brainware) to navigate menus. Perhaps I’ll just have to skip the del día items or perhaps see them on another table and point.

So on to cecina.

This is a common item on menus I’ve encountered before but it tends to be more feature on menus in Castilla y León. In fact this geographical interest is so strong there is also the specific Cecina de León, an IGP (Indicación Geográfica Protegida, EU equivalent protected geographical indication).  This specific item even has its own website (https://www.cecinadeleon.org/) explaining how it must be produced.

It’s not actually a mystery of what this is (although for a long time it was unavailable in the USA; oh, and now it appears actual cecina from Spain is still not available in USA so this is an imitation made in the style of León) but now you can buy it online where it is described:

Tender sliced cured beef with a deep red color and rich smoky flavor is León’s answer to jamón. This is cecina, a premium cut of beef cured with sea salt and smoked over oakwood with no preservatives. Cecina is Spain’s culinary secret, just as worthy of culinary acclaim as Spain’s famous hams. And like jamón, over thousands of years the people of Spain have transformed the curing of beef from a necessity to an art, creating a delicate, flavorful meat unlike any other in the world.

In another article I was saw it described as ‘chipped beef’ which would possibly be close but certainly an insult to this seriously expensive dried meat.

So, what should the translation be? Or is this one of those terms, say like chorizo or lomo, that you just have to know what it is?

But Google thinks it has the answer. Most of the time (and often it doesn’t translate cecina at all) Google thinks it is ‘jerky’. While the official description about its elaboración (method/recipe of production) has various similarities to most recipes for making jerky the best descriptions I can find is that jerky is not that equivalent.

So what does the English version of the menu at this restaurant say? Here are a couple of references, again with Spanish in first column, Google Translate in second and website English translation in third:

Ofrecemos servicios de corte de jamón/cecina, quesos artesanos al corte, cervezas artesanas… We offer ham / cecina cutting services, cut artisan cheeses, craft beers … We offer professional ham / beef jerky cutting services, sliced local artisan cheeses, craft beers and more.

Note that in this case Google didn’t translation cecina at all but the website does refer to it as ‘beef jerky’ and the human translation otherwise seems very close to the original Spanish.

And another reference:

Lunes: Salmorejo con Cecina IGP. Monday:  Salmorejo with Cecina IGP. Monday: Salmorejo with Smooked Beef  IGP.

Note that ‘smooked’ is in the menu itself as is another typo ‘Thuesday’ which certainly makes it look likely this is the work of a person.

And then our final reference:

El menú del cabildo es una
salmorejo de tomates de mansilla con cecina IGP, puerros de sahagun, escalibada de pimientos del Bierzo…
The menu of the cabildo is a
salmorejo de tomates de mansilla with cecina IGP, leeks of sahagun, escalivada of peppers of the Bierzo …
The Cabildo menu is a proposal ‘Salmorejo’ or cold-tomato soup made with local ‘Mansilla’ tomatoes and beef-jerky, ‘Sahagun’ leeks, ‘Escalivada’ or roasted vegetables on flat rustic bread and made with local ‘Bierzo’ peppers…

So here we see beef jerky again. So either the author believes calling it jerky will best describe it to an English speaking person or they had to use some dictionary lookup, which, btw, lists: ‘smoked’, ‘cured’ and ‘salted’ meat (each as a separate term when the elaboración explains ALL these steps are involved in creating cecina).

Now the imitation online stuff refers to cecina as “The “beef version” of jamón” and the picture shows a solid piece of meat whereas the elaboración  is quite clear the meat must be thinly sliced before any other processing so a solid ham-like chunk certainly doesn’t match the IGP definition.

And, finally, our sometimes reliable English version of Wikipedia adds this information in its description:

is made by curing beef, horse or (less frequently) goat, rabbit, or hare

Emphasis on ‘horse’! Since I’ve also found this item on a different León menu: Cecina de Burro. Now burro might be a brand or a geographical reference but it might also be, in fact its literal translation, ‘donkey’.  Pure beasts, work in the hot sun and when they’re worn out they end up on the table – no thanks.

So finally I might end up calling cecina “thin slice of mystery meat cured in salt, then dried (by heat or sun) and (usually, but not always) smoked”. So I think a consultar ties in nicely with cecina and strongly recommends spoken fluency to find out what you’re eating (or at least know the phrase ¿Qué animal es este de.

Blog note

After consolidating terms from numerous menus, plus the recent post about restaurant terms, I substantially updated the page under the tab RESTAURANT PHRASES. The main change was the addition of a list of phrases which I’ll include here for convenience. Enjoy!

 

In this list the notation {x|y} means this word occurs with either x or y in this position, usually this is gender in adjectives, so {a|o}. [x] means optional, most often [s].

a elegir to choose [from]
a tu elección at your choice
acompañad{a|o}[s] accompanied
al centro in the center (of table, i.e. for sharing)
al estilo X in the style of X
al gusto to taste (doneness), i.e. cooked to order
al peso by weight
bebida[s] drinks
carta the a la carte menu
casa literally house, from this restaurant
caser{a|o} homemade
combinados combinations
degustación tasting/taste (often a separate menu)
del día of the day
diario daily (available item or open)
elaboración preparation
eliges tú los ingredientes you choose the ingredients
en temporada in season
entrantes starters (aka appetizers)
especialidad specialties
horario hours (as in when it is open)
incluid{a|o}[s] included
ingredientes ingredients
mesa table (different from tabla)
para acabar to finish (after main part of meal)
para comer to eat (main part of menu)
para compartir to share
para picar to nibble on (aka snacks or appetizers)
por encargo on request
postres desserts
precio[s] price
primeros [platos] (primer) first course
segundos [platos] second course
selección/seleccionado selection/selected
servido [con] served [with]
surtido assortment
tabla board/plank or platter (usually an assortment, often of ham)
unidad unit (abbreviation uds)
vari{e|a}d{a|o}[s] assorted, varied, variety

Too many menus, too little time

I’m only about five miles away from León (on my virtual trek, previously mentioned) where I’m bound to find a lot of online restaurant menus so I’ve been rushing to finish my list from the city of Palenica. I can work on the menus in bits and pieces, extracting and formatting the material into my source files and then analyzing the entries, doing lookups and searches on terms that machine translations handled badly. This isn’t easy and beyond mere mechanical, sometimes, but I can pick it up and put it down, thus squeezing this work into crooks and crannies of my day.

But the real work, actually generating a corpus and then, even more, creating the software to collate all this and actually create a Spain food translator that is far better than the extant machine translations requires a really concentrated effort and so I’ve essentially done none of this. I have to remember what it was like to work hard all day long on this kind of task, day after day, as I did when I was in a real job of software architect. But I find I can never get around to this for a “fun” project.

In between is writing these posts. I can’t do that in bits and pieces either. While a post is a shorter task I still require some concentration and focus, plus usually even more research. But that’s the good part. My quick cursory analysis of menus is sufficient to find specific translation issues for posts and thus, wanting to get it right in the posts, the need for more careful research and conclusions. And even though this may only be a few hours it’s hard to get that hunk of uninterrupted time. So my posts have really been infrequent.

I write the posts as part of a discipline to do this work more carefully. Knowing someone might notice my mistakes and then (and I’d love it if they did) comment as to my mistakes forces me to be more careful. Plus, sometimes, I try to tell more story than just the translations and that even enriches my data collection more.

So posts are great to do (and hopefully of some interest to you, Dear Reader) but it’s hard to get them done.

I have material for at least six posts about the menus from Palencia that I’ve studied. I really hope I can apply myself and get these posts done before I start digging in León menus.

So here are some restaurants you might find interesting. There were 159 restaurants in my starting list but I only looked at the ones with real websites (the Facebook sites are useless to my purpose and frankly, IMHO, worthless to a potential customer). Many of the websites then have little information and especially lack menus. Then often the menus are in two formats I just barely can use: 1) just images (i.e. no text to extract from browser so have to manually transcribe, hard to do accurately) or, 2) PDF’s. While I can usually (not always) get text from the PDF’s it: a) takes a lot of manual post-processing to organize, and, b) then it’s not easy to get Google translations (I have to build my own temporary webpage from the extracted and processed PDF information to let Google chomp on it), and, c) using Microsoft’s translation within MSWord is both a bit clumsier and overall somewhat inferior to Google (although in some cases it is better as well).

So my criteria for looking at restaurants in the following list has little to do with any sense of their quality or interesting cuisine. BUT, that said, usually I’ve found what appear to be the better restaurants often also have the better websites. I encourage them (not that any of them will be listening) to put more work in it. Perhaps for local clientele websites are not very important but for tourists I believe they’re beginning to be critical. I have another post about how I was persuaded to recently visit, even going out of my way, a particular restaurant in Ohio solely on the grounds of its website, although later learning it was also “rated” as one of the best in Columbus. And while pretty pictures of the food and glowing descriptions are nice online menus are far more important, again IMHO, for “selling” your restaurant to new customers.

So here’s the list I’ve processed, hopefully with stories to come when I can find the time for posts.

Bar Comedor El Garaje http://barelgaraje.es
Bar El Cobre https://barelcobrepalencia.es/
Casa Pepe’s http://casapepes.es/
Dominos (just wanted to compare to both US menus and local restaurants but some new vocabulary did appear) https://www.dominospizza.es/carta-de-pizzas
El Majuelo http://www.elmajuelopalencia.es
El Rincon de Istambul (interesting since they focus on Turkish food and so had non-Spanish items I had to look up) http://rincondeistambul.es
Gastrobar Donde Dani http://gastrobardondedani.es
Habana Cafeteria (interesting that a cafeteria has different selection which revealed some new terms) https://habanacafeteria.com
La Barra de Villoldo https://labarradevilloldo.com
Ponte Vecchio (interesting since they focus on Italian food and so had non-Spanish items I had to look up) http://www.pontevecchio.es
Restaurante – Cerveceria Las Hurdes http://cervecerialashurdes.com
Restaurante Asador Palencia La Encina http://www.asadorlaencina.com/es/palencia/
Restaurante El Brezo http://www.elbrezo.com
Restaurante La Cantara https://restaurantelacantara.com
Restaurante La Traserilla http://www.latraserilla.es/
Restaurante-Bar Mano http://barmaño.es
Restaurante-Cervecería Moesia https://moesia.es/