estoy de vuelta de Oklahoma

I had some family business in Oklahoma and so planned some other sightseeing for about a week. But things didn’t work out. I read that this has been the most rain over twelve ever recorded for the USA. Certainly I can personally attest to that around here. So what is normally hot and dry and dusty area was a swamp. Two different Interstate highways were closed. But I did get to my farm and check out the grass (all it grows) and the wind turbine (which was really turning, but we didn’t get cancer or see any “carnage” of dead birds so I don’t know which wind turbine Trumpidot visited to see such things but in the real world it’s all lies). But that aside.

What does any mean for the primary topic of this blog. Well first I also visited my birth town of Amarillo Texas. Never when I lived there did I know: a) amarillo is Spanish for yellow, and, b) it’s not pronounced ama-rell-o. And the original state was really Tejas and later anglicized to Texas. And we visited Palo Duro Canyon which was just a name to me, as in ‘hard stick’ as Google translates and Wikipedia confirms but I see no connection with that place. But the point is a great deal of names for things in Texas are from Spanish which of course makes sense as Texas was part of Spain, then Mexico, longer than it has been part of the USA, something most Texans choose to ignore. So I grew up surrounded by Spanish but was hardly aware of it. Later I spent most of my professional life in California. By that time I knew the first town I lived in, Palo Alto, and the next, Los Altos, certainly were Spanish names and that the main street of both, El Camino Real, were Spanish. It was a long time after living there that I learned Los Gatos was named for the mountain lions.  So in some ways it’s remarkable to me that it’s taken me 71 years to really attempt to learn Spanish.

I planned to keep up my language study on Duolingo on the trip but I’d started a process of recording exactly what drills I did, first in an Excel spreadsheet and then in an app I wrote. Both were working fine when I transferred these over to the laptop we use exclusively for travel. Of course, when I needed them both failed. I had the source code of my app, but my development environment was expired and I’d lost all the passwords, then my Office 365, while not expired, demanded a login and I didn’t have that password. So with no way to record my study in Spanish I essentially stopped doing it. I did a few drills in French and German just to keep up my “streak”, but basically I lost about 6 days.

And I’m amazed at then how much I forgot. Certainly I remembered 98% but several words I’d used in drills just before leaving on the trip I could no longer recall.

I’ve been grappling with this for a while. Duolingo does a lot of repetition, especially if you do every drill in every exercise (instead of testing out) but then there isn’t a lot of repetition of previous material. I had already developed an app to counter this, something I could use daily to refresh my memory, but since it was just vocabulary drill (glorified flashcards) that wasn’t enough. So I wanted to repeat entire drills (usually 20 individual questions) to also deal with grammar, word order, gender and verb conjugation. But a lot of repetition of previously learned material cuts into learning new material. For me it’s not so much a question of time, which I have in sufficient quantity, as merely endurance, i.e. I can only take so much language study each day.

And in development my app to manage what Duolingo material I’d do I also did a simulation and my first results in that indicated it would take nearly two years to complete the full Duolingo “tree” (their entire course which puts you somewhere in the A2 (CERF) range). With the initial algorithm I had for also including repetition it shot out to more than three years to finish. Given I’d like to visit some Spanish speaking country sooner than that it means: a) I have to carefully ratio repetition, just enough to retain what I’ve learned, and, b) actually increase my daily effort. To stay on schedule, i.e. aim at the big picture each day requires more than casual attention so my app, with all the data recording, statistical analysis and prediction is necessary, at least for someone like me to make the right daily progress toward a long term goal.

So I’ll leave you with a trail photo. While this is up in the mountains of Wyoming we saw a lot of this on this trip, including some flooding over the roads too much to cross at all.

 

 

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