Glossary Updated

This post describes a recent process to update the glossary found on this blog. I believe a reader should know how a glossary is assembled in order to know how much to  trust its accuracy so I’m trying to be as transparent about process as possible. Furthermore my glossary has two “biases”: 1) it is aimed at terms found in Spain, not any Spanish term from anywhere, and, 2) I (mostly) only include terms I’ve actually found on the hundreds of  menus from restaurants in  Spain I’ve collected and analyzed to create a highly curated corpus. So while the glossary has considerable effort in constructing it naturally it still has errors as it was manually compiled. But I believe it is one of the better and more exhaustive glossaries you’ll find, at least for free on the Net.

After eight more days of work since my post about this effort I decided to call it “done” and update my glossary page as version 4.0. The glossary gained about 150 items, had numerous errors corrected (especially spelling, especially accents), had some definitions changed or enhanced, and adopted my “syntax” to show all the forms of this word under under a single “lemma” (just learned this term from linguistics).

Despite all the work I did there are still mistakes, omissions, inconsistencies in the lemma representations and other errors. This is the challenge of manually editing a large amount of material, even while trying to be very careful. Each time I do this manually I learn a bit more about how I’ll have to create the software to create and manage a properly curated corpus which I’ll need for my translation application.

Not every term in this glossary is really a “translation” to English as often there is no translation. So instead, based on terms I have found in the many menus from Spain restaurants that I’ve analyzed as the “raw” data, I have sometimes had to supply a description instead of either a “definition” or a translation. For instance, I researched and added most of the names of grapes used in Spanish wines, olives used in tapas and cheeses used in various dishes. While one might translate Cabrales as “blue cheese” this isn’t that helpful so descriptions work better.

So almost every term in my glossary I have found in menus. There are more terms in the various glossaries I’ve found and assembled but unless I actually see a term used in a menu in Spain I can’t be certain some term from some other glossary actually applies to Spain. Or, of course, Spanish food terms in other parts of the world may mean something entirely different than they do in Spain and so I’m trying (as best I can) to focus on the vocabulary one would encounter in Spain.

I may do some more “fixes” or additions to this glossary but I don’t expect to do another major revision. As it is this is now one of the largest glossary you’ll find anywhere on the net (and perhaps the easiest to access, just a single, albeit, long webpage, not some more complex access scheme). So while this glossary, like anything you find on the Net, is easily available one should ALWAYS be somewhat skeptical as the editor is human and makes mistakes, so check with authoritative sources for any terms that might really matter for you.

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