A Camino not taken

Since I lived in California, in Palo Alto, not far from the major street El Camino Real I have known that ‘camino’ means way or route or road. What I’ve now learned is that it is derived from the verb caminar and the first person singular (yo) conjugation is camino; IOW, it also means “I walk”. I was born in the city of Amarillo Texas which I now (mostly) know how to pronounce correctly and that it is the masculine singular adjective ‘yellow’. Interesting how Spanish has been all around me.

But that’s not what this post is about. As I’ve mentioned I’ve gone off now on several digressions from my original project and subject of this blog – that is a virtual trek along the Camino de Santiago, decoding restaurant menus along the way so I can produce a food specific translation tool. I haven’t dropped that project and from time to time, given I’m still putting in miles on my treadmill which I convert to distance along the Camino route I do check what restaurants I “encounter”, that is via Google maps and StreetViews and their ratings and most importantly user submitted photos. I’ve seen thousands of typical mom-and-pop Spanish dishes but with the exception of a Spain oriented restaurant in Columbus Ohio I have yet to actually taste any comida español.

What I have been doing, after getting a new computer to use in my programming projects, is going back through 30,000 old digital photos and selecting those that either are visually interesting or interesting as reminders of my travels. So, in the absence of any other posts getting created, I thought I could just try adding a few of these photos. I’ve had a fondness for photos, otherwise fairly boring, of roads or, better, trails I do manage to walk. So I figured I’d post all my photos of trails (many more interesting than much of the Camino) and when I run out of those then some roads.

So I’ll start with this one:

Note: I still haven’t quite figured out how WordPress resizes photos so I have much higher resolution photos than I’m posting and I’ll have to figure out the trick to getting better quality.

I picked this shot because it fits my title – the footpath bifurcates with a more obvious trails and a lesser one. Naturally I hiked the lesser one (this was about four years ago).

The location is the Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota, USA. I camped there for about a week, often overrun by bison who decided the fresh spring grass in my campsite was what they wanted to eat. So I sometimes retreated to my car as a thin nylon tent is not much to stop a bison. This park has its name from the fact that President Teddy Roosevelt, as a young man, had various physical weaknesses and he chose to go to North Dakota (not then a National Park) and try his hand at ranching. Despite definitely being a “dude” from a rich East Coast family, tough and later rough-rider Teddy eventually impressed the locals with his tenacity and energy. So when the land was transferred to the US Park Service naturally it was named after him.

Now the area of the park is interesting because it appears almost out of nowhere in the middle of very flat plains of western North Dakota. While, at the bottom (where that trail is, the first photo), it can appear to be mountainous but it is actually canyons created by the Little Missouri River, which eventually flows into the Missouri River which is the border of my home state, about 10 miles away. So here’s a sample of the larger area from the top of the canyons:

Note: This photo still looks horribly fuzzy to me despite having 1920 pixel wide resolution – what is WordPress doing?

Since this is spring it’s quite green at this time of year but this is mostly prairie with some cedar trees. It was consider fairly inhospitable to any life and was known as “badlands”. But now there is actually a Badlands National Park in South Dakota, which I visited on the way to TRNP and it looks rather different.

So this is my first “camino” post with what looks like disappointing photos (in WordPress edit mode) and hopefully these images will look better in the finished post. Otherwise I’m clueless, now, how to get decent photos that I have (from a Nikon, not a cell phone) into posts.

I won’t do that many of these so it’s not just filler until I get back to Spain restaurant menus but I do enjoy (me gusta caminar) and I have some photos to prove it.

p.s. Since I mentioned bison (incorrectly called ‘buffalo’) I suppose I should include a picture of one of those sitting in my campsite near my fire pit.

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This is a real wild (and very large) animal. I was amused by signs warning tourists not to bother the wildlife, but there was no sign explaining what to do if the wildlife was bothering us!

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Something different

One problem with a virtual trek is that I don’t get an chance to take my own photos. I can’t post photos of other people so I can only talk about my “trek”. So photos to follow, but a little preface (scroll down if you’re impatient for the good stuff).

Well, actually I do go places. And I take photos. I very much enjoy the posts of loyal readers with fantastic photos, places I’d love to see, but at least I can experience through other people’s postings. So here’s a few to return the favor.

So, I recently got a new computer and I really wanted a new and fresh set of photos for my screen saver on my new large display. So I dug into my archive of over 40,000 photos to pick a few of the best. It was an adventure to look back over almost 20 years and a variety of digital cameras.

And while Spain, my current interest, is not much like Texas, there is some resemblance. When I first moved to Nebraska from the San Francisco Bay Area (Los Altos to be specific) I was really depressed. Withing an hour of my old house I could find, even on foot, beautiful country. Within a few more hours I could either be cross-country skiing or sipping wine in Napa or riding my bike along the Pacific Coast. In contrast even 6-8 hours of driving from Omaha it’s still just cornfields. So I went crazy, also given it is winter in Nebraska, and I threw my backpacking gear in the car and headed south. Three days later I found myself in Big Bend National Park in Texas. Now I get to say anything I want about Texas because I was born there in a city called Amarillo, needless to say nowhere near the correct Spanish pronunciation of the adjective, ‘yellow’. Texas is a huge state, probably bigger than Spain, so I’d never been to Big Bend and it was a thrill to visit. Later I convinced my wife that visiting some place where I’d been sleeping in a tent on the ground was still a fun vacation.

As many of my loyal Readers are not from the USA, you might still know that our insane president (pretender) wants to build a wall along the USA and Mexico border. Actually there is a “barrier” on most of the border except Texas. Folks in Texas hate “imminent domain” so even putting up fences has run into local opposition. But the real “barrier” is nature, fierce, but beautiful.

But far more important a big chunk of the US/Mexican border is a fantastically beautiful place, either the National Park  or the Texas State Park. Twice I’ve visited this area and the second time I had a digital camera so here are so photos to give you feel for this beautiful place AND how impossible the terrain is for any sort of hordes crossing the border. I’m not sure I’ve seen any border that is LESS possible for easy crossing. And it would be horrible to spoil the beauty of this area with an utterly useless Wall just to make MAGAs in Michigan (who’ve never been anywhere near the border) happy.

So here are my photos, please ENJOY this beautiful place. And for once I can contribute something to see.

Ick. There is something I don’t understand about posting photos. These photos look like a blurry mess, but not what I have in my files (these are originally 15Mpixel files from a Nikon). I’m trying various things to make them look like I see them, not sure what WordPress needs.

Here are a couple of scenic vistas in the general vicinity of the border:

Actually this isn’t quite near the border, it’s the Chisos Basin in Big Bend National Park but that’s where I was for this fantastic sunrise (it is about 5AM and a long exposure). Chisos Basis is the only accommodation in the park and is surrounded by mountains on all sides. The air is incredibly clear, and, of course dry (it is desert) so sunrises and sunsets are fantastic.

Do I mention you can see the sky here. My photos don’t even come close to the experience you can have, standing in the desert and seeing sky everywhere.

But now we come to the border.

From the US side this is looking north, in Texas State Park, with the Rio Grande behind us.

(Note: these photos look crummy to me, but they’re not all blurry like I see them as I make this post. I guess I don’t understand how to incorporate good photos in WordPress – click on the photo for a better one, but still much lower resolution than my original).

You can just barely see the river here, but this is a hint of surrounding country.

And here it is = the border, the Rio Grande – you can see the streams of immigrants flooding across. They come well equipped with climbing gear.

Again does that look like the kind of river you’re going to see a migrant caravan of women and children rushing across? Go luck kids.

A few miles down the river, still rough country – great sightseeing on the highway on the US side, pretty rough country with miles of desert on the Mexican side.

Here the Rio Grande might be easy to cross, but

here, not some much. This is the St Elena Gorge, as awesome cleft with steep cliffs on both sides of the border. When I first went to Big Bend my parents, who were “snowbirds” (people in cold climates with RVs who head to warmer climes near the border) warned my about Mexicans stealing my car. When I saw this gorge my reaction was – GOOD LUCK. A huge expanse of fierce desert to get to this gorge and then technical rock climbing to get to the US side. Hey, anyone intrepid enough to make that journey can steal my car! Needless to say there were no car thieves and anyone except USA tourists anywhere near this spot.

Maybe this crossing is lot easier, but still seriously demanding of outdoor skills.

And in case these barriers are not discouraging here’s a few other things you would face.

 

Amazing, this guy, about the size of my hand was just sauntering across the highway. Supposedly they’re fairly gentle but I wouldn’t want to put that idea to the test.

And, just more fun

These are called “horse crippler” cactus, and for good reason. Anyone daring this part of the world needs serious boots (and a good eye not to step on these).

A few times in my life I just zipped through the southwestern deserts of the USA but when I finally visited, slowly, on foot, these areas I was stunned at their beauty, something you have to see close up and in sync with nature.

The idea of putting a 10m high wall across this country, despite its stupidity for all the other reasons, is a criminal offense against the sanctity of nature. Spain has its beautiful spots, which I still hope to see, but the USA has fantastic spots as well.

Now, these photos are yucky, so I’m going to see if I can make them look better, more like I see them (I do have a rather good Nikon camera to shoot this stuff, not some two-bit cellphone camera).