A few words from Astorga

As I mentioned in my previous post I lost a long and heavily researched post about something unusual I found in the area around Astorga, or more properly La Maragatería (link is to Spanish language site) is a Spanish region located in the central area of the province of León. It seems there is a local meal (multiple courses) that many restaurants promote, the cocina maragato (link is to Spanish language site). While I won’t try to reconstruct my entire post about this I will recover a few things.

cocina maragato is a meal of multiple courses: meat, vegetables/legumes and soup but it has the unusual feature of being eaten in reverse of the normal order. This idea is summed up in this explanation from one of the restaurants serving this meal (original Spanish from website on the left, Google Translation on right, items of interest in bold).

El cocido maragato tiene la peculiaridad de comerse al revés.  

Primero las carnes, luego los garbanzos y verduras y por último, la sopa.

Estos tres servicios se denominan, en la zona, “vuelcos”. 

The cooked maragato has the peculiarity of eating upside down.

First the meats, then the chickpeas and vegetables and finally, the soup.

These three services are called “rollovers” in the area.

First, al revés can be translated as ‘upside down’ but it has multiple translations according to its Wiktionary entry:  as an adjective, ‘inverted (with respect to something)’ and as an adverb, ‘1) in the opposite direction or order, 2) back first, 3) inside out, 4) the other way around, and, 5) upside down’. revés alone has various definitions:  back, wrong side, other side, inside. Now given the numerous explanations of cocina maragato it’s clear the most useful translation, in this context is the ‘in the opposite direction or order’ since that is the key feature of this meal.

Second, my first encounter with cocina maragato was seeing vuelcos on multiple menus, such as: Primer vuelcoSegundo vuelco and Tercer vuelco. These are headings in the menu where one would normally see platos (in typical menu context, ‘courses’). So the translation as ‘rollover’ was definitely mysterious until one understands the cocina maragato context.

Still none of the online dictionaries have caught up to this meaning of vuelcos as they go with the simpler and more literal translations: ‘upset’, ‘spill’ or ‘complete change’. Interestingly Google’s choice of ‘rollover’ doesn’t appear but it is found in a reverse lookup of the English ‘rollover’ in spanishdict.com. So it’s hard to think of a single word translation that would imply the correct meaning in this context, but ‘inversion’ (or clumsy, ‘reversed course’) would probably be closer than ‘rollover’.

And since I can’t recreate the entire post I’ll just cover one other word that I’ve often seen on menus in the context that this restaurant uses:

El Cocido Coscolo no es sino un agradecido heredero del cocido tradicional maragato.

Sobre esa base, hemos introducido algunos cambios que hacen de nuestra propuesta algo diferente.

Su principal valor es la elaboración propia de los ingredientes.

The Cocido Coscolo is nothing but a grateful heir to the traditional cocido maragato.

On that basis, we have introduced some changes that make our proposal somewhat different.

Its main value is the preparation of the ingredients.

This restaurant, Restaurante Coscolo, is explaining how its eponymously named Cocido Coscolo is its version of cocido maragato. The word I’m focusing on is propuesta which I’ve seen on numerous menus and Google has always translated it as ‘proposal’.  In other encounters with this word ‘proposal’ made some sense in the context it is used but never seemed quite right, to me, as the translation. Dictionaries go further with these literal translations: ‘offer’ or ‘design’, or ‘nomination’ (in the sense of proposal of a candidate).  While the ‘nomination’, according to the dictionary would clearly apply to a person for a job/office, not a particular preparation, it nonetheless fits. Along with the idea of ‘offer’ or ‘design’. I’d use the translation, ‘take’, as in the phrase “our take on the traditional xxx is yyy”.

But this would be clumsy to have to explain this rather than just use ‘take’ as translation (which certainly wouldn’t fit other contexts). And this will be a challenge for the app I intend to build and suggests that one feature of the app has to be the ability to put a single word in the translation but touching that word would bring up a popup dialogue with a longer explanation to provide the context that is too verbose to include directly in the translation. So analyzing this menu and word provides insight to a UI feature I should include.

I had more about this whole area and other restaurants and this meal but this is all I can reconstruct in a reasonable time. You’ll just have to do your own research if you want more.

 

 

 

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Lost a post

This is primarily a note to myself to punctuate the flow of this blog to reflect some history.

I’m disappointed that I managed to delete a post I had mostly composed. Sometimes, and usually for more difficult posts, I work offline in MSWord to compose my posts. The way WordPress works isn’t that helpful for posts that take a while to compose or when I need to do more research for the subject of the post. And in the case of my lost post I was doing a lot of background research.

Previously I’d complained (in other contexts) about losing posts or especially comments in WordPress. Since the text editor running in a browser can’t access the local file system no temporary saves can be made (for posts, but not comments, WordPress does some saves to its cloud). I’ve lost enough that way to have adopted working offline (which can do temp saves) but even that is subject to human error.

So, what the post was about was restaurants in Astorga (surprised to find so many) and a local dish that is quite popular and featured by many of those restaurants, cocina maragato. I had done a lot of research on all this which was contained in the incomplete post I lost (also the menu translations that were background source information for the post). So you can go look at Astorga yourself (via Google Maps) and start with this link for cocina maragato.

Then, poof, in too much of a hurry I deleted the entire post AND the multiple menus I’d extracted and analyzed. What happened was that in attempting to add a new menu strange stuff showed up when I pasted the content from the website into MSWord. So I thought I was reversing that paste but instead deleted all the text in the file. Later in the evening while doing shutdown of my computer I got the notification from MSWord whether I wanted to save or not and, stupidly, just said yes without checking what changes it was trying to save. Poof, now I have an entirely empty file that previously had been many pages long.

This was quite discouraging to lose hours of work so I’m doing this notification post to kind of purge my despair and thus get back to work again on menus. And then make some new real posts.

 

Additions to glossary

The glossary page in this blog, at the moment, has been compiled by hand. This is NOT the process I intend to use for my definitive glossary to embed in my translation app since hand compilation is subject to numerous errors, plus the source material may be incorrect. But I like having some result even before I manage to generate a definitive glossary where each entry is found in numerous sources and checked against authoritative guides.

In the past I’ve searched for glossaries all over the Net and manually consolidated them. The result was a mess due to: a) often the source glossary had mistakes made by whoever compiled it, b) the Spanish terms may not apply to Spain which is my focus (for example, hongo is mushroom in most of Latin America but rarely used in Spain), and, c) terms from a glossary may not overlap as I want with actual references on menus (in Spain) which is my focus.

All that said, nonetheless I continue to make additions. In this case I was looking at some travel books and cookbooks I’d gotten on my previous fascination from Spain and realized I had the Langenscheidt Pocket Phrasebook (Spanish), 2006 edition, which includes a 1400 word dictionary. So I fairly quickly went through the dictionary and extracted words that relate to food or to restaurants. From that list I found which were not already in my v3.2 of the glossary. Now I’ve updated my glossary page, but here I’ll show what kinds of words were missing (previously the glossary page had come entirely from extracts of menus). A few of these terms, I realized, should also be included in my restaurant terms page, so that has been updated as well.

abierto open
achicoria chicory
amarg{o|a} sour
aromáticas herb
asiento seat
avena oats
batido milkshake
boca mouth
bombilla bulb
botella bottle
brazo arm
brécol broccoli
bufet buffet
caballa mackerel
cabeza head
calle street
camarer{o|a} waiter/waitress
carajillo coffee with brandy
cartilago cartilage
cena dinner
centeno rye
cerebro brain
cereza cherry
cerrado closed
cervecería beer hall
cerveza de barril draft beer
cerveza rubia lager
champán champagne
cóctel cocktail
col cabbage
comer to eat
comestibles groceries
composición ingredients
coñac brandy
concha shell
condimentad{o|a} seasoned
confitería candy store
conserva canned food
cortado espresso with a dash of milk
crema de leche coffee creamer
cruasán croissant
cubiertos silverware
cuchillo knife
cuello neck
cuenta bill
cuerpo body
desnatada low-fat
destilería brewery
diente tooth
dinero money
endibia[s] endive, correct spelling as previous was wrong
entero whole
entrada entrance
erizo de mar sea urchin
especias spices
espeto skewered
espina fish bone
espumoso sparkling (in wine context)
estómago stomach
estragón tarragon
estrella star
factura bill
fruta del tiempo seasonal fruit
ginebra gin
gofres waffles
gratuito free of charge
guayaba guava
helada frost
hervid{o|a} boiled
hervid{o|a} cooked
hierba herb
higos fig
hornillo stove
hueso bone
infusion de hierbas herbal tea
jardín garden
jarra jug, pitcher
langosta lobster
lengua tongue
limonada soda
macedonia de frutas fruit salad
manzanilla chamomile tea
margarina margarine
menú menu
mojado wet
molino mill
músculo muscle
nectarina nectarine
número size
ocupad{o|a} taken
ojo eye
pan integral whole grain bread
penecillo roll
pez espada swordfish
pierna leg
poleo de minta peppermint tea
polvo powder
pomelo grapefruit
primavera spring
propina tip
raíz root
reserved{o|a} reserved
ron rum
rosado róse
rosbif roast beef
sala hall, room
salami pepperoni
salida exit
sandía watermelon
sangre blood
sarro tartar
semana week
semiseco medium dry
sémola semolina
servicio restroom, service
servilleta napkin
suplemento surcharge
taberna bar
tea
tenedor fork
terraza terrace
trucha trout
uva grape
vajilla tableware
ventanilla counter (window)

 

Multilingual menus in Spain

I took a detour from studyingg restaurant menus in León to San Sebastian. San Sebastian is 189 air travel miles east of León, along the Atlantic coast and near the border of France. This puts it squarely in Basque Country and its restaurant menus reflect that.

San Sebastian is also a very popular tourist resort with extensive beaches, recreational activities, luxury accommodations and dining, 728 restaurants listed with Trip Advisor. Since it is a popular tourist destination I discovered multiple restaurants there have multilingual menus. Interestingly sometimes they are just bilingual in Castellano (aka Castilian, the most common version of Spanish) and Euskara (the name of the Basque language in Basque) – not surprising due to the cultural influences.

The restaurant I’ll be discussing was interesting in that instead of alternate menus in different languages (which sometimes don’t match very well) it has all its menu items in four language, including French and English. While I’ll show some “translations” within the menu are not literally accurate at least in this kind of menu I get what a person believes is the item in different languages instead of machine translation. So this is from BODEGA DONOSTIARRA located in Donostia which is the Basque name for San Sebastian. A typical example is:

Ensalada de morros con guindilla y cebolleta

Google Translate:

Morros salad with chilli pepper and chive

from the menu

Muturren entsalada, pipermina eta tipulinarekin

Salade de museau de porc avec le piment d oquer et l ́oignon

Pork snouts salad with spring onions and local green peppers

Now sometimes having the French helps clarify the item but my project is to create a corpus of corresponding terms in English and [Castilian] Spanish so the remainder of this post will focus on interesting issues in this menu. For the item above, however, I’ll note several issues:

  1. Google has usually missed morro (in context) but does literally translate the single word (not in context) to ‘nose’. My dictionary prefers ‘snout’ (in sense of an animal part) and lists ‘nose’ only in the sense of an airplane part and lists ‘lip’ and ‘mouth’ as colloquial terms for body parts. I wonder what is in the Google corpus used to train their AI that decides morro is just morro in English which generally means ‘A round hill or point of land’ from various dictionaries so certainly its “context” is not culinary.
  2. The translation of guindilla to ‘chilli pepper’ is interesting. First the ‘chilli’ version of the word is the British not the USA spelling (chili). Second usually chile (and chili is a dish, well known to me as I was born in Texas, no beans, of course) is used in combination with pepper, so chilli is kinda doubly wrong for me. And while guindilla can be used as the generic ‘chile pepper’ it is actually a quite specific variety of pepper popular in the Basque areas also known as piparras.
  3. And thirdly cebolleta (the diminutive of cebolla (onion)) has various translations (according to spanishdict.com) as ‘scallion’ or ‘green onion’ (in USA) and ‘spring onion’ (in UK). Another bit of evidence that Google Translation AI is trained on a UK derived corpus. And, while unlikely in this menu item, cebolleta can also be ‘chive’ which any gardener knows is not the same as a scallion (which presumably is the same as spring onion).

So this is a good menu to look for some issues in translation by comparing the human and machine translations (as well as my “guessing” using various searches and lookups). So here’s how I’m analyzing the items on this menu.

Spanish (from menu) Human translation (from menu) Google translation
Ensalada Donostiarra (pulpo, boquerón, antxoas, sardinillas, bonito, guindilla) Donostiarra salad: octopus, anchovies, baby sardines, tuna and local green peppers Donostiarra salad (octopus, anchovy, antxoas, sardines, bonito, chili pepper)

There are a couple of interesting issues here:

  1. Google didn’t translate antxoas because, of course, this is the Basque spelling whereas anchoa is the more common Spanish. But there is something else going on in that boquerón also translates to anchovy, which Google got. A search for the difference between anchoa and boquerón gets a lot of opinions, none I can label as definitive but generally (and especially in this area) boquerón is probably also cured with vinegar.

    antxoas may not be the same as the generic anchoa since I did find this, “The Cantabrian anchovy or Bay of Biscay anchovy (scientific name, Engraulis encrarischolus) is one of the specialties of Basque cuisine” which could be very relevant in the context of this menu. But the human translation omits any translation of antxoas (or instead, possibly omits boquerón). So you pays your money, you take your chances.

  2. sardinillas is not in my dictionary but the Spanish for ‘sardine’ is sardina. So here it looks like the human translation is helpful in that they’re interpreting the diminutive form of sardina as ‘little’ which is appropriate. Given sardines are already little (given those packed in tins) I wonder what this really means. No clue from either translation whether these might be fresh or cured sardines which is a major distinction in Italian cuisine.
  3. Google almost always doesn’t translate bonita but sometimes does  generate the literal ‘pretty’. Trusting Wikipedia as a reference source we see that bonita is a valid English translation as it refers to a specific tuna, “The skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) is a medium-sized perciform fish in the tuna family, Scombridae. It is otherwise known as the aku, arctic bonito, mushmouth, oceanic bonito, striped tuna, or victor fish.”. The human translator choose to just call this ‘tuna’.
  4. And continuing the discussion of guindilla (from previous example) the human translation is interesting, ‘local green peppers’. Given the low heat level of the specific guindilla pepper I can see just calling it a ‘green pepper’ (not exactly what the USA reference is to a bell (or sweet) pepper) and labeling it as ‘local’ seems to distinguish it from the generic chile pepper translation. To me the padrón peppers look the most like “green peppers” but those are typically found in Galicia and so wouldn’t be “local”.

This single example does show a real challenge in “translating” menus – what really is this dish? Even the human translation would leave you guessing. And thus this shows a real limit to what any translation can do.

So let’s look at a couple more items.

Pulpo vinagreta “Salanort” Picled Octopus Octopus vinaigrette “Salanort”

Our human translator has a bit of a spelling problem with what almost certainly is supposed to be ‘pickled’ which is not really quite the same as one usually finds for vinagreta (usually a vinaigrette). But neither the human translator or Google explain what Salanort is. I’m relatively confident in what I found which is “a family business located in the fishing village of Getaria, 30 minutes from San Sebastian”. This qualifier appears several times for this restaurant and is typical of one of those terms that is a specific reference (aka brand) and has no translation BUT still may have some consequence to the customer.

Pintxo paleta ibérica Cured iberian ham pintxo Pintxo paleta ibérica

Google doesn’t translate paleta but it’s easily found in dictionaries as ‘shoulder [blade]’.  The human translation calls this ‘ham’ despite ‘ham’ having the clear Spanish jamón and usually ham comes from the rear leg of the pig, not the shoulder (however, in USA the so-called ‘picnic ham’ can come from the shoulder). And ‘cured’ is basically redundant with already saying ‘ham’. pintxo is interesting in that Google doesn’t translate this at all and pintxo is the Basque for what is called pincho in other parts of Spain (and in English as well and it is NOT tapas, the humorous scene in the movie The Way revealed). ibérica, which is literally Iberian, is not helpful, purely as a translation, but one could hardly go to Spain and not know what this means (and it’s not really a reference to Iberian Peninsula as dictionary says but instead to a particular type of pig).

And while there are numerous other smaller translation issues in this menu I’ll close with this one:

Pluma ibérica de Guijuelo  “Guijuelo” iberian pen Iberian feather  from Guijuelo

Guijuelo is most likely a reference to a municipality located in the province of Salamanca, Castile and León known for their pork. Here I believe the human had to use a dictionary for translation as pluma can be ‘pen’ but more likely ‘feather’ as Google decided. However neither of this is either correct or useful translation. It turns out this is more descriptive “The pluma is a cut from the end of the loin, and is juicier than the presa steak or the solomillo tenderloin. Pluma is fairly thin, but leaner than the ‘secreto’ skirt steak.” from online supplier La Tienda who will sell you one.

 

I’m continuing with other menus from San Sebastian that are multilingual including an interesting one for sushi where I might get some Spanish terms, if they exist, as translations from Japanese. The adventures continue.