A few terms from ensaladas

I’m continuing to extract terms from a large set of recetas, having switched from postres (desserts) to ensaladas (salads).  Now thinking about salads there is a lot more diversity than merely leafy green stuff with some dressing so this is another lode of terms to find and add to my corpus. So here are a few fragments I’ve found:

Ensalada de verdinas con perdiz escabechada, receta fácil Salad of verdinas with pickled partridge, easy recipe

As usual terms that Google Translate doesn’t translate or has silly answers catch my attention, so what are verdinas? Oxford has an entry that translates to ‘moss’ and it’s plausible a salad might include moss. But this is what makes this source so useful, it’s not just titles of dishes, but the full recipe (ingredients and instructions) and a photo of the dish. In this case the photo reveals the clue to verdinas, showing a bag of alubia verdina which are called Verdinas De Nuestra Tierra in the ingredient list. IOW, since I’ve seen alubia often this is just a specific type of bean (visible in the photo) described here.

So moving on:

Remojón  granadino, receta fácil para el Verano Remodo  granadino, easy recipe for summer

Why Google Translate translate remojón to ‘remodo’ remains a mystery as I can’t find any association. Oxford literally translates remojón to ‘soaking’ and granadino to ‘of Granada’ which doesn’t help much. Fortunately this has no English equivalent but is

a specific recipe with oranges, cod, onions, tomatoes and olives, soaked in olive oil for at least four hours.

so an item like this has to be entered in my corpus with a “description” rather than a translation.

And finally:

Salpicón de bogavante con vinagreta de su coral Lobster salty  with vinaigrette of its coral

So we have two mysteries here: 1) what is a ‘salty’ (presumably the translation of salpicón), and, 2) what is ‘its coral’ (untranslated from coral in the Spanish)?

salpicón is the easier one since it’s a particular preparation of “chopped seafood or meat with onion, tomato and peppers” described here so ‘salty’ is a mysterious translation and inaccurate.

Salpicon (or salpicón, meaning “hodgepodge” or “medley” in Spanish) is a dish of one or more ingredients diced or minced and bound with a sauce or liquid.

But to figure out coral required looking at the recipe which fortunately describes it thusly:

the contents of the inside of the head (of the lobster) and the dark colored matter that is full of flavor

While I couldn’t find any English equivalent for coral (or any definition that matches the recipe) I believe this is a delicacy that some adventuresome foodies like. Now I’ve use the heads of shrimp and their shells to make stock so I suppose this is the same but this sound pretty yucky to me, which means if I had this salad and quite possibly enjoyed it I’d rather not know what coral is.

As the last tidbit the recipe text also includes two interesting terms:

  1. brutal bogavante which Google translated to ‘brutal lobster’. What’s this, some lobster with monster claws that fights back? Actually Oxford did explain that brutal has a colloquial meaning of ‘incredible’ or ‘amazing’ which is a lot more appealing (and reasonable guess at translation)
  2. and un platazo which didn’t appear in any dictionary but was found by search in an obscure (scanned) old text as ‘great dish’ which does fit the rest of the context so also is a likely translation.

These “guesses” I sometimes make have some amount of likelihood of being correct. I’m fairly certain of something like verdinas as a type of bean, but it is a guess and therefore has to be entered in my corpus which some uncertainty. And brutal and platazo have even less authoritative evidence and so would have higher uncertainty.  The Google Translates corresponding English to Spanish also can not be viewed as “certain”. Probably only translations appearing in one of the authoritative dictionaries can be entered as p=0.999 in the corpus. So getting as much volume as possible so every term in the corpus has multiple instances will be key to getting the best possible translation dataset.

 

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