Tidbits from Appetizers and Starters recetas

Following up on my previous post I’m going to comment, briefly, on a few fragments from the new source, specifically recetas (recipes) for Aperitivos y Entrantes (Appetizers and Starters). Even just the first page (of 26) has some interesting translation issues.

Tortillas de trigo integrales rellenas de langostinos en salsa de piquillos Whole wheat tortillas stuffed with prawns in piquillo sauce

I’ve previously mentioned that tortilla is one of those words that has different meaning in Spain than in, say, Mexico. In Spain this is an egg-and-potato dish somewhat akin to the Italian frittata. But in this case there is a photo of the dish and sure enough it’s a plain old tortilla as we’d call it in the USA.

Palmeras saladas con tapenade negro y pesto verde Salted palm trees with black tapenade and green pesto

This is one of those cases where I shouldn’t jump to a conclusion (or label this as a ‘literal fail’). I figured ‘trees’ didn’t fit and it was probably palm ‘hearts’ (a more normal ingredient). But no, this is a cute pasty where a sheet of puff pasty is stuff and then rolled up from both ends and sliced and baked, making something that does look like a palm tree.

Brazo de gitano salado de pimientos del piquillo, queso, canónigos y nueces Salty gypsy arm of piquillo peppers, cheese, lamb’s lettuce and walnuts

Here I figured translating brazo as arm was probably wrong so I went to look up brazo in Oxford. Oxford helpfully provides some typing completion aids so as I was typing brazo it suggested the phrase brazo de gitano so that’s a bit two specific not to be the match, whose definition (Spanish from Oxford, English from Google Translate)

Pastel dulce de forma cilíndrica elaborado con una capa de bizcocho que se rellena con alguna crema y se enrolla sobre sí misma. Sweet cylindrical cake made with a layer of sponge cake that is filled with some cream and rolled on itself.

I was hoping to find the origin of this term so there I use search but in the unclear trick I’ve mentioned in a previous post an English Wikipedia article is served by Google search (I now suspect they translate to English and search Wikipedia). So this appears to be a “Swiss roll”  or  ‘jelly roll’ but still where does this come from? This article has only a partial explanation.

And finally is ‘cherry tomato’ really just tomates cherry? The standard Spanish word for ‘cherry’ is cereza, but again using Oxford typing completion aid it uses both cereza and cherry following tomate. So a loanword from English filters into Spain?

 

 

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