Where did I go?

I was generating fairly regular posts but then dropped out of sight for almost two weeks – what happened? Well I’ve been out of town and thus mostly offline, south to Oklahoma. It’s not that Oklahoma doesn’t have the Net – I was just busy and my work on food terms in Spain is on a computer back home so I had nothing new to post.

Oklahoma is a long and not very interesting drive from Nebraska with most of the distance in Kansas. To most people the variation is scenery is so slight they’d say it all looks the same (and it has some of the same dusty and dry character of the part of Spain now along my virtual trek on the Camino). But to those of us starved for something to see there is a difference, even several regional variations (e.g. the Flint Hills) on the drive and it is easier to make that drive with brief excursions off the main route.

I was doing the trip to meet with a new attorney to finally start the process in Oklahoma to transfer my mother’s estate to her heirs. Her/our family has had a farm there for four generations. The farm isn’t much, as a farm. It served, many decades ago, as a subsistence farm for the family with most of its production for the family’s own consumption. Some cream and eggs got sold for cash to buy things. But industrialized agriculture, in the USA, has largely driven this type of farm out of operation. Today it serves just as grazing land for a tenant rancher. Much of the land in the immediate area is abandoned for agriculture.

But today the land grows something else – energy. On our 1/8th section (80 acres, sounds large but that is small in USA) there is one wind turbine from a fairly large wind farm (just like the turbines one sees along the Camino as Spain is more advanced in use of wind power than the USA). It was chugging away most of the time we were there (this is the windy and stormy time of year) and every revolution puts some cash in the pocket of landowners. Wind is new, oil and natural gas are old. The new and sometimes controversial technology of horizontal drilling and fracking has drastically increased production. So there is a new well, over a mile away on the surface, that has sent out its horizontal shafts under our land. And these horizontal wells, with a much large collection area (than a vertical shaft) is also a nice income.

That is, if I can ever get the deeds settled. Back when the land was just for low value farming the legal standards of ownership records were less. Today there is more at stake and so the standards are higher. Probably in any multigenerational ownership story, almost anywhere, there are gaps – some probate was never filed with the county clerk, some conveyance deed was properly signed or dated, or some change in marital status wasn’t recorded, or whatever. Everyone (local) knows Person X owns the land but challenged these claims may not stand up. So therefore I will have substantial legal bills and years of chasing lost documents to ever establish ownership (by my mother) which no one challenges. What fun!

Meanwhile the drive, as I mentioned, is fairly boring so we try to spice it up a bit with geodashing. Once upon a time there was no GPS (at all, then for a while it was only massively expensive military technology). I happened to work next door to Trimble who developed the first civilian GPS technology, later made more affordable and so learned of GPS before most people. So when commercial GPS was new and just barely available to the public it was a novelty and a number of “games” evolved using GPS. geocaching is the best known. For a while everyone wanted to rush out to those spots on the globe, known as confluences, where the GPS would read XX.0000 and YY.0000.

There are only so many of those and all that could be found have been. So geodashing  was developed to create artificial and thus sustainable purely random locations to find. And to make a game out of the search. Why? For fun. What is there? geocaching goes to some place, for sure, that another person has been (they left the cache there) but geodashing goes to a completely unknown (to outsiders, obviously locals know it) location. The game insists on not violating trespassing so often the location is not reachable (we must get with 100 meters). So each month when the new dashpoints are published we silly folks doing this game put them on maps and figure out whether they can be reached via public right-of-ways and then, more importantly, if there is any pattern that can allow reaching the most dashpoints with the least driving.

OTOH, when one has a long drive we look for something to break up the monotony by locating nearby dashpoints along the route. The drive from Nebraska to Oklahoma can be done purely on freeways (really limited access multilane highways as one part, the Kansas Turnpike is definitely not “free”). It’s really boring to just see 550 miles of pavement. Tourists drive through the midwestern “fly-over” USA states, especially along I-80 in Iowa or Nebraska hoping to get to the interesting tourist destinations further west, so I-80 looks really monotonous (and is).

But get off the main route, designed for speed, even if a non-tourist part of USA interesting things can be found. Before the Interstate highway system drivers were on two-lane roads that deliberately went into every town along the way. Frankly this is a lot like what I see on the Camino, a route that reaches a new small town every few miles. As in the USA there is some parallel route high-speed highway to go from the major spots, i.e. Logroño to Burgos that bypasses all these towns. But the Camino walking moves at a different pace and that is exactly the point.

And it is the same point with geodashing. There is no there-there at a random longitude and latitude (sometimes there actually is). It is the JOURNEY, not the destination. The slogan of geodashing is “getting there is all the fun” and that’s why we crazy people do this. There are surprises everywhere and interesting things one never even knew existed. Sure everyone knows about Yellowstone or Glacier or Grand Canyon or Yosemite but what is in Templeton Iowa or Arthur Nebraska? Scale is everything and that is part of the appeal, to me, of the Camino. When you zip by at 120kph in a car everything outside is a blur, but passing on foot at 5kph (and easy to stop and look around) the world is different. And driving on a farm road (which here look much like most of the Camino route) at 50kph and being able to stop anywhere since it might be hours before another car comes by is a very different way to see the world.

So the route from Nebraska to Oklahoma is really boring, unless you can get off the main road, if only for a bit, and see something you never expected by going to someplace entirely random. There may be huge historical differences between geodashing and a pilgrimage on the Camino but there is also a lot of similarity.

 

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2 thoughts on “Where did I go?

  1. Wow, I loved this. You managed to bring in so much — law, land, technology, energy, dreams. I think you have got to be smarter than me – I believe every word makes sense but a little of it whizzes by me like the cars on I-80,which is part of the fun. It feels organic.

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    • And I wish I could be as fearless as you with your adventures – mine are tame by comparison. While I have been fascinated with the Camino I am also put off by the crowds. This is a mixed blessing, crowds means lots of infrastructure to support trekkers but it also removes some of the tranquility of travel. Meeting people is fine but getting away from that is another kind of experience to also be enjoyed.

      btw: geodashing is a worldwide recreation, the 32,000 points monthly are everywhere on land. While most geodashers are from the most expected places many have also reported on more exotic and less-traveled places. Reading some of your travel you have probably come within kilometers of a dashpoint. Even the most basic navigation support is sufficient to claim finding dashpoints.

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