No Cabecilla Asada for me, thank you

On my virtual trek of the Camino de Santiago I’ve almost made it to Burgos. So I’ve started digging through menus there. In order to find anything useful I need restaurants that have websites with text menus. There are 379 possible (according to Trip Adviser) and I’ve dug through 28 of them so far.

I encountered an item, Cabecilla Asada, that mystified me. Now that I’m writing the post I actually can’t find that item again but I recorded in my notes that cabecilla (asada is easy, i.e. roasted or grilled) translate, via Google Translate, to nipples, knives, nuggets and heads, depending on the context.

So here are a few of the translations:

Spanishdict.com says “cloth padding on one’s head”, Oxford says (with Google Translate of its definition):

Persona que está al frente de un grupo o movimiento, especialmente si es de protesta u oposición contra algo. leader: Person who is in front of a group or movement, especially if it is a protest or opposition against something.

and DLE has various definitions that match. But this isn’t much help. Somehow in doing searches I encountered cabecillas de lechal al horno which finally got me on the right track. lechal (various forms) I’ve encountered before – this is a unweaned young animal usually referring to a pig or lamb. But the search results also turned up a different variant: Cabezas de Cordero Asadas al Horno .

And cabezas is the key here. This is more simply ‘head’. But ‘head of suckling lamb”, you’re kidding, right?

But no once I’d worked the problem this far I found two recetas and photos: here and here. Yep, it’s a lamb’s head split in half and grilled (don’t believe me, follow the links to photos).

I suppose this is some kind of delicacy and maybe I’d eat it if seeing it (the brains in the skull) weren’t obvious what it was, but frankly I think I’ll pass on this. It may be wonderful but I’m just not that fond of unusual animal parts.

And the point of this is that it does help to know even fairly obscure terms used on menus. Without the ability for full conversation, who knows, I might order this. And then be unpleasantly shocked. Others may love this but I’m glad I’ll now have cabecilla in my corpus to warn me away.

Added later:

When I was composing this post I couldn’t find the online menu where I’d gotten a mention of Cabecilla Asada, but now I found it again (here).  This item actually appears twice, in the trailer of several of the pages of this restaurant and on the Especialidades linked page. In one case (for exact same Spanish) Google Translate said (for cabecilla) ‘heads’ and in the trailer mention it says ‘nipples’. And I found the other page (here) where a very similar item, cabecillas de lechal asadas al horno, is mentioned and it translates as ‘knives’. Also interesting in the original Spanish (and translation) is the redundancy of asadas and al horno (either would do).

 

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anguila o angula – a typo?

I first encountered angula in the context of a menu item: gulas a la bilbaina. Now gula itself seems to translate as ‘greed’ or ‘gluttony’ so I assumed this was some outrageous dish. But a few more searches convinced me gulas is just a colloquial short form of angulas. The first time I tried to get a translation I mistyped angula as anguila which I then learned was ‘eel’. Also in searching about the dish I got some hint there was a connection with eels so I added angula as eel in my corpus.

But on a proofreading session I looked up angula again and got this definition (in Spanish with Google Translate):

Cría de la anguila Eel breeding

which didn’t exactly make any sense.  It turns out the 4th definition (in Oxford) of Cría makes more sense:

Conjunto de las crías que tiene un animal en un solo parto o una sola puesta Set of offspring that has an animal in a single birth or a single laying

Switching dictionaries I just went back to a straight translation (not definition) and got ‘elver’. My problem was I’d never heard of elver before and so didn’t know it by the more colloquial ‘baby eels’ which would have cleared up all the mystery.

But as this very good article on this food item explains, elvers, while tiny, are hardly ‘babies’:

When these tiny eels arrive in fish markets, they are already two or three-years old, but are only about 3 inches (8cm) long, and as thick as a strand of spaghetti.

While they are tiny they are outrageously expensive, even more than caviar or truffles. So, in fact, they’re rarely used and instead a substitute “mock” angula, which is then known as a gula, is almost certainly what you’ll get with this tapas.

As this article explains:

the fake angula, made of the same surimi with which the Japanese fabricate artificial crab

surimi itself is:

fish (often pollock) that is minced to make a gelatinous paste that is then flavored, reformed into flakes, sticks, or other shapes, and colored

Now back to the original issue, what is the dish gulas a la bilbaina?

angulas in an earthenware dish with garlic, olive oil, and chili peppers cut in rings

recipe and picture found here.

So the claim that gulas are a reasonable substitute for angulas seems likely given the huge price difference and a preparation that probably masks the taste anyway.

Now anguilas seem to be more common and reasonably priced in Spain but don’t mistake this word for anguilla which is a British overseas territory in the Caribbean.

 

Where did I go?

I was generating fairly regular posts but then dropped out of sight for almost two weeks – what happened? Well I’ve been out of town and thus mostly offline, south to Oklahoma. It’s not that Oklahoma doesn’t have the Net – I was just busy and my work on food terms in Spain is on a computer back home so I had nothing new to post.

Oklahoma is a long and not very interesting drive from Nebraska with most of the distance in Kansas. To most people the variation is scenery is so slight they’d say it all looks the same (and it has some of the same dusty and dry character of the part of Spain now along my virtual trek on the Camino). But to those of us starved for something to see there is a difference, even several regional variations (e.g. the Flint Hills) on the drive and it is easier to make that drive with brief excursions off the main route.

I was doing the trip to meet with a new attorney to finally start the process in Oklahoma to transfer my mother’s estate to her heirs. Her/our family has had a farm there for four generations. The farm isn’t much, as a farm. It served, many decades ago, as a subsistence farm for the family with most of its production for the family’s own consumption. Some cream and eggs got sold for cash to buy things. But industrialized agriculture, in the USA, has largely driven this type of farm out of operation. Today it serves just as grazing land for a tenant rancher. Much of the land in the immediate area is abandoned for agriculture.

But today the land grows something else – energy. On our 1/8th section (80 acres, sounds large but that is small in USA) there is one wind turbine from a fairly large wind farm (just like the turbines one sees along the Camino as Spain is more advanced in use of wind power than the USA). It was chugging away most of the time we were there (this is the windy and stormy time of year) and every revolution puts some cash in the pocket of landowners. Wind is new, oil and natural gas are old. The new and sometimes controversial technology of horizontal drilling and fracking has drastically increased production. So there is a new well, over a mile away on the surface, that has sent out its horizontal shafts under our land. And these horizontal wells, with a much large collection area (than a vertical shaft) is also a nice income.

That is, if I can ever get the deeds settled. Back when the land was just for low value farming the legal standards of ownership records were less. Today there is more at stake and so the standards are higher. Probably in any multigenerational ownership story, almost anywhere, there are gaps – some probate was never filed with the county clerk, some conveyance deed was properly signed or dated, or some change in marital status wasn’t recorded, or whatever. Everyone (local) knows Person X owns the land but challenged these claims may not stand up. So therefore I will have substantial legal bills and years of chasing lost documents to ever establish ownership (by my mother) which no one challenges. What fun!

Meanwhile the drive, as I mentioned, is fairly boring so we try to spice it up a bit with geodashing. Once upon a time there was no GPS (at all, then for a while it was only massively expensive military technology). I happened to work next door to Trimble who developed the first civilian GPS technology, later made more affordable and so learned of GPS before most people. So when commercial GPS was new and just barely available to the public it was a novelty and a number of “games” evolved using GPS. geocaching is the best known. For a while everyone wanted to rush out to those spots on the globe, known as confluences, where the GPS would read XX.0000 and YY.0000.

There are only so many of those and all that could be found have been. So geodashing  was developed to create artificial and thus sustainable purely random locations to find. And to make a game out of the search. Why? For fun. What is there? geocaching goes to some place, for sure, that another person has been (they left the cache there) but geodashing goes to a completely unknown (to outsiders, obviously locals know it) location. The game insists on not violating trespassing so often the location is not reachable (we must get with 100 meters). So each month when the new dashpoints are published we silly folks doing this game put them on maps and figure out whether they can be reached via public right-of-ways and then, more importantly, if there is any pattern that can allow reaching the most dashpoints with the least driving.

OTOH, when one has a long drive we look for something to break up the monotony by locating nearby dashpoints along the route. The drive from Nebraska to Oklahoma can be done purely on freeways (really limited access multilane highways as one part, the Kansas Turnpike is definitely not “free”). It’s really boring to just see 550 miles of pavement. Tourists drive through the midwestern “fly-over” USA states, especially along I-80 in Iowa or Nebraska hoping to get to the interesting tourist destinations further west, so I-80 looks really monotonous (and is).

But get off the main route, designed for speed, even if a non-tourist part of USA interesting things can be found. Before the Interstate highway system drivers were on two-lane roads that deliberately went into every town along the way. Frankly this is a lot like what I see on the Camino, a route that reaches a new small town every few miles. As in the USA there is some parallel route high-speed highway to go from the major spots, i.e. Logroño to Burgos that bypasses all these towns. But the Camino walking moves at a different pace and that is exactly the point.

And it is the same point with geodashing. There is no there-there at a random longitude and latitude (sometimes there actually is). It is the JOURNEY, not the destination. The slogan of geodashing is “getting there is all the fun” and that’s why we crazy people do this. There are surprises everywhere and interesting things one never even knew existed. Sure everyone knows about Yellowstone or Glacier or Grand Canyon or Yosemite but what is in Templeton Iowa or Arthur Nebraska? Scale is everything and that is part of the appeal, to me, of the Camino. When you zip by at 120kph in a car everything outside is a blur, but passing on foot at 5kph (and easy to stop and look around) the world is different. And driving on a farm road (which here look much like most of the Camino route) at 50kph and being able to stop anywhere since it might be hours before another car comes by is a very different way to see the world.

So the route from Nebraska to Oklahoma is really boring, unless you can get off the main road, if only for a bit, and see something you never expected by going to someplace entirely random. There may be huge historical differences between geodashing and a pilgrimage on the Camino but there is also a lot of similarity.

 

Menú peregrino

This post was going to start as one of my milestones on my virtual trek but along the way I found something more interesting. In terms of milestones I just passed through the small village of Villambistia and while doing my usual search and investigation of either restaurants or albergues/hotels I found this delightful place: Casa de los deseos (I guess the literal translation of ‘home of the wishes’ could make sense, but deseo has a few other meanings). A search for it in maps.google.com will get you information or you can use this coordinate as the search in Google maps: 42°24’15.6″N 3°15’37.1″W.

On the satellite view it appears to be an empty lot (a bit ambiguous on the Street View) but the photos that Google has associated with Casa de los deseos show a charming place that looks quite new, so perhaps it has been built since the last satellite photo of this village. In one of the photos the following menu for peregrinos (pilgrims) is clearly visible and I’ve copied it for here. It’s a simple menu which is typical of the fairly cheap, but hardy food options for trekkers.

* Espaguetis – Macarrones

con tomate – carbonara

* Legumbres

Garbanzos, alubias, lentejas

* Ensalada Mixta

Tomate, lechuga, maiz, zanahoria

* Lasaña

* Filetes de lomo con pimientos

* Pechuga de pollo con pimientos

* Huevos fritos

* Tortilla francesa

* Pollo asado

* Panini

Pan, agua o Vino

2 PLATOS A ELEGIR: 8,95€

1 PLATO A ELEGIR: 4,95€

Despite having no fluency in Spanish I did recognize most of this, either simply as cognates to English or as a consequence of short-term memory acquisition of some food terms in Spain doing these blog posts and my project. zanahoria (carrot) and lentejas (lentils) are the two items I couldn’t remember. A ELEGIR is not obvious but I’ve mentioned this in other posts (to choose). lomo, the subject of one of my earlier posts is probably the cured meat, not the loin of some unmentioned animal, but this is probably something one would want to ask (or see at some other table).

I was a bit mystified by Tortilla francesa. As I’ve mentioned just the plain term tortilla is seriously different in Spain (potato and egg dish) than anywhere in the western hemisphere (masa flatbread). It’s often qualified as tortilla española but it’s such a common dish on the Camino it is usually seen on menus just as tortilla. This blog post and this blog post, here at WordPress.com, have a  nice explanation of these two egg dishes and the difference. I suppose I should have done the ah-ha moment and thought francesa might be the omelet.

For me I think I’d be hungry enough I’d go for 2 PLATOS and choose Pollo asado (probably simple grilled chicken, I’m guessing dark meat since chicken breast (pechuga de pollo) is a different item) and the Ensalada Mixta.  If the Legumbres dish had included chorizo I’d go for that as the usual hearty meal for trekkers, but I think they’d mention that if it did. And, for me, not much of a tossup between agua o Vino. (The bar in this place looked fun to so I suspect they’d have some decent ordinary vino.) cerveza I’d skip in any of these places since that’s one area where I’m spoiled with great craft beer in the USA (nearby Iowa has the most breweries per capita of any state) and it’s almost always watery lager found in Spain.

8,95€ isn’t cheap but it’s hard to find an actual sit-down restaurant in small towns we visit while geodashing in USA that would be much less. But this is one very appealing part of the Camino, the support found in these tiny villages, such as Villambistia. There is a trail here in Nebraska, the Cowboy Trail, that doesn’t look much different (than the Camino) in terms of the walking but it’s around 30-50 miles between towns that even have a restaurant and even further between towns with overnight accommodations. So trekker there can only work if you have a support team with a car (also, needless to say, there is no public transportation to take you to some town). So finding not just the usual albergue but this very nice one would almost make it worth visiting Villambistia.

 

Updated the Spanish Term Index page

You can see on the menu bar of this post “Spanish Term Index”. This is a “page” (not a post) in WordPress.com terminology. I just caught up a bit and have now indexed terms on the oldest 20 posts (of now 67). I only include terms that I discuss enough in a post to get a reasonable understanding of the term (casual mentions without definition I exclude).

So I have a lot of work to do to catch up with all the more recent posts.

Fortunately WordPress.com and MicroSoft Word cooperate with each other. MSWord has a variety of tools to make updating the list easier. When I’m done then I can copy the list from MSWord and just paste into WordPress.com’s page. This page is going to get very long, once I catch up and then keep updating from new posts.

In addition to providing a guide to you, Dear Reader, this also provides me the opportunity to quickly see if I’ve done terms in previous posts and thus avoid a later post (unless I have new information) that would be redundant.

Note that the index does NOT provide the English translation (you’ll have to click on the links to see that). So I have another page, now out-of-date as well that will be my accumulated glossary, which I hope, someday, to be the most complete and accurate glossary you can find on the Net. Right now it’s more an experiment than my actual “authoritative” (i.e. researched) glossary but [eventually] it will be my glossary.

WordPress.com isn’t the best tool for compiling a glossary but it’s all I’ve got. OTOH, glossaries (or dictionaries) I’ve found elsewhere on the Net aren’t so great either (either the method of access or their content). Maybe if I get a really solid and very good list I’ll spring for a website and build some interactive code to be able to lookup these food terms from Spain. If not a smartphone app (that is, something a lot more portable that could work offline) at least you could come to my glossary, with the browser in your phone (if you have a connection) to get information about menus. That may have to do until I can figure out how to actually code an app and have a really good term list for it.

 

Post formatting problem found and fixed

I thought I was going to have to do a bunch of tedious work here at WordPress.com and then I discovered the problem.

I had a post (and thought there was more than one) where the entire body of the post had been converted to italics. This is bad since I make an effort to clearly mark Spanish (or other non-English) terms in italics with the English part of the post in non-italics. I noticed at least one post “screwed up”.

I tried various things to recreate the problem and failed to find what was causing this. The body of the post looks fine in the WordPress WYSIWYG editor but is wrong when viewed. I thought I’d have to repost a bunch of posts to correct this and that was going to mess up the history of this blog. But better to have the formatting of the posts correct.

So I started with the most recent post that had this problem. In one window I’d have the bad post open so I could copy and paste its text to a new post. A pain but the only way I thought I could fix it.

Then I saw the problem.

WordPress.com’s editor has a toolbar to select italics for some text in the body of the post. BUT that doesn’t work on the title. So being familiar with direct editing of HTML I used the <i>word</i> in the title, which works to get the Spanish word in italics in the title.

BUT, what if one forgets to include the </i> in the title?

Well, that messes up the HTML WordPress.com generates when they display the post and so italics is turned on but never off, so it applies to the entire post.

So mystery solved and a few posts are now repaired and in their proper (i.e. original) sequence in the blog.

Whew! Glad I spotted this and now know what I have to avoid.